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PERSONAL NARRATIVES 



OF EVENTS IN THE 



War of the Rebellion, 

BEING PAPERS READ BEFORE THE 

RHODE ISLAND SOLDIERS AND SAILORS 
HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



No. 13 -Second Series. 



PKOVIDENCE: 

N BANGS WILLIAMS & COMPANY 
1883. 



Copyright by 
N. BANGS WILLIA:\rS. 



l-KOVU)ENCE PKESS CO.MPANY, I'l:l.\TI-.RS. 



THE HIGH SCHOOL BOYS 



Tenth R I, Regiment, 



WJTH A 



ROLL OF TEACHERS AND STUDENTS 



OF THE PRO¥IDENCE HIGH SCHOOL, 



WHO SEKVED IX THE ARMY OR NAVY OF THE UNITED STATES 
DURING THE REBELLION. 



WILLIAM A. SPICER, 

COJU'AXY B, TEXTH RHODE ISLAND VOLUXXEEKS. 



PROVIDENCE: 
N BANGS A\' I L L I A M S & C O 51 T A N Y 

1882. 



Copyright by 

N. BANGS WILLIAMS. 

1882. 



THE HIGH SCHOOL BOYS 



TENTH R I REGIMENT 



Our school days were cast in eventful times. 
Some of the Providence boys who met twenty years 
ago, in the old High School on Benefit street, can 
hardly have forgotten the stirring events which pre- 
ceded the war, and the memorable presidential cam- 
paign of 1860, when they joined the Lincoln wide- 
awake army, proudly shouldered their torches and 
marched on to victory, little heeding the threatening 
clouds of secession orathering- in the Southern hori- 
zon. How few then, at the Xorth, young or old, 
realized the nearness of the storm which was soon to 
burst forth and rage for four long years, carrying 
blight and desolation into almost every family in the 
land. A struggle which cost the lives of more than 



b THE HIGH SCHOOL BOYS OF 

half a million brave men, and cost the nation also, 
dnvinsT the last year, more than three million dollars 
a da_y ! and left it, at last, with a debt of more than 
two billion seven hundred millions I 

The excitement which followed the attack on Fort 
Sumpter, in April, 1861, was fully shared by the 
High School boys. Every one was expected to show 
his colors, and it was voted to purchase and raise the 
national flag over the High School building. Hear- 
ing that the college boys were about to unfilrl the stars 
and stripes over University Hall, (where, eighty- 
eight 3'ear8 before, the old Revolutionary flag had 
floated,) it was determined to get the start of them, 
if possible. Wednesday afternoon, April 17th, at 
five o'clock, being the time appointed for the exer- 
cises at the college, the following High School an- 
nouncement appeared in the Journal of that day : 
"The 'stars and stripes' will be raised this afternoon 
from the High School, at Jialf jjo-'^t foirr !" But the 
boys were finally induced to defer their public demon- 
stration till the following morning, though they 
couldn't refrain from indulging in a little informal 
raising, at the hour first announced, thus securing 



THE TENTH R. I. REGIMENT. 7 

the desired priority, and the following notice from 
the Evening Press: "High School Patriotism. — A 
splendid national flag, purchased by the subscription 
of over one hundred High School boys, was dis- 
played from the High School building, this after- 
noon !" The formal exercises next morning were of 
a most interesting character. At eleven o'clock, in 
the presence of teachers, scholars, citizens, and soU 
diers about leaving for the war, the boys raised the 
flag, followed by the singing of the "Star Spangled 
Banner." The young ladies of the school carried 
email national flags. Mayor Knight delivered a brief 
opening address, and introduced Professor Chace, of 
Brown University, who responded with scholarly and 
patriotic sentiments. Bishop Clark related an anec- 
dote of his great grandfather, who, after the battle of 
Bunker Hill, was obliged to sleep in a baker's oven, 
and added, "I am glad that he did not get htiked, 
else I should not have been here to-day to address 
you!" and turning to the "Marines," who were to 
leave that afternoon for Washington, with the 1st 
Rhode Island regiment, he said, "some of you may 
have to sleep in a baker's oven before you get back. 



8 THR HIGH SCHOOL BOYS OF 

but I hope you will uot get baked, but live to come 
home well bre(a)d men, as you now are." They 
were indeed soon tried in the fiery furnace of Bull 
Run, and some never returned. Ex-Mayor Rodman, 
in his pleasant manner, referred to a conversation 
between General Xathanael Greene and his mother, 
during the Revolution, in which she cautioned him 
"not to get shot in the back !" Dr. Caldwell made an 
impressive closing address, when "America" was 
heartily sung, fi^llowed by cheers for "the Union," 
"the young ladies of the High School," "Governor 
Sprague," the "First Regiment," and the " Marines." 
"Fifteen cheers and a Narragansett" were also served 
up by the boys for a dispatch read by Bishop Clark, 
" that Virginia had decided not to secede." But 
they found out, a few days later, that they had wasted 
their ammunition. 

It was now apparent that there was sufBcicnt 
military spirit to warrant the formation of a High 
School company A meeting was held in the hall, 
at which a committee of arrangements was appointed, 
and in a few weeks the boy8 fell into line under the 
name of the "Ellsworth Phalanx," in honor of the 
youthful and gallant commander of the Xew York 



THE TENTH R. I. REGIMENT. 9 

Zouaves, who had been shot at Alexandria, Va., May 
24th, while engaged in lowering a rebel flag from a 
hotel in that city How it would have startled the 
members of the Ellsworth Phalanx, had they been 
told that in the next year some of their number 
would be marching through that same rebellious 
city, and by the very hotel where Ellsworth fell ! 
but so it proved, the boys singing " Ellsworth Aven- 
gers " with a will, and "John Brown's Body," as 
they went "marching on." 

The beautiful standard of colors presented to the 
Phalanx, was the gift of the young ladies of the 
High School. Daniel W. Lyman, late our accom- 
plished senator in the assembly from North Provi- 
dence, was chosen captain. An arrangement was 
made with the United Train of Artillery by which 
their armory on Canal street became the headquar- 
ters of the corps, which, under the direction of the 
veteran Colonel Wescott Handy, of the Old Guard 
Continentals, soon attained a creditable degree of pro- 
ficiency Those were refreshing seasons ; who can 
forget them? when, alter the long and toilsome drill, 
or street parade, good Col. Handy marched us 



10 THE HIGH SCHOOL BOYS OF 

through his root and herb beer estjibli.shnicnt, near 
the Great Bridge, and treated one and all to a large 
glass of his celebrated beer, "compounded strictly 
from medicinal roots and herbs." May his memory 
ever remain as fragrant as his Jeer.' What ^vonder 
that the corps rapidly advanced in discipline and 
spirits, and soon attracted not a little public atten- 
tion for its steady and soldierly bearing on parade. 
Its brilliant evening receptions, also, and exhibition 
drills, Avill be pleasantly recalled. How they enliv- 
ened the long winter evenings of '61 ! 

But the Rebellion was not yet subdued. Brighter 
days were looked for with the opening of '62, but 
jNIay came, and with it fresh news of disaster to 
the Union cause. Stonewall Jackson had sent Banks 
whirling down the Shenandoah Valley, to the Poto- 
mac, and at midnight, on the 25th, a dispatch came 
to Providence announcing the disaster with an ursrent 
appeal for troops for the protection of the capitol. 
Just an hour later the Governor issued an order to 
immediately organize a new regiment, the Tenth 
Rhode Island vohmiecrs, for three months' service. 
The response was prompt, and among other militarv 



THE TENTH R. I. REGIMENT. 11 

organizations, the Ellsworth Phalanx contributed a 
liberal quota. The regiment was principally drawn 
from a volunteer organization of the citizens of 
Providence, known as the "National Guards," Colo- 
nel James Shaw, Jr., commanding, who was in- 
structed by the regiment to otfer its services "as then 
officered and organized." But Colonel Shaw, though 
an able and accomplished officer, felt that the chief 
command should be given to one who had received a 
military education ; whereupon the Governor ap- 
pointed Captain Z. R. Bliss, of the regular service, 
colonel of the Tenth, and James Shaw, Jr., lieuten- 
ant-colonel. By seven o'clock p m., of the day 
of the call, G13 men were reported ready for duty; 
and the day following, the 27th, the Tenth regiment, 
under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Shaw, 
left for Washington, Colonel Bliss being detained at 
home on account of his father's death. At the head 
of Company B, recruited almost entirely from the 
ranks of the High School and University companies, 
marched Captain Elisha Dyer, formerly Governor of 
the state. The men are few, who, at his age, (over 
fifty,) would have abandoned the comforts of home 



1:^ THE HIGH SCHOOL BOYS OF 

for the arduous position of capt:iiu in a volunteer regi- 
ment. Most of the permanent officers were gentle- 
men well known to the men, including Lieutenant-Col- 
onel James Shaw, Jr., afterwards Colonel; Major 
Jacob Babbitt of Bristol, killed at Fredericksburg 
the following December ; Adjutant John F. Tobey ; 
Dr, George W Wilcox, surgeon, and Rev- A. 
H. Clapp, the honored pastor of the Beneficent 
Church, chaplain. Hon. Nelson W Aldrich, our 
able senator in congress, was then, at the age of 
twenty-two, a member of Company D, and Hon. 
Joshua M. Addeman, secretary of state, a private 
in our student Company, B. And we would not 
forget, also, to honor the name of our youthful and 
lamented comrade, Frederick Metcalf, son of the 
worthy President of this Society- Although but 
fifteen years of age, he enlisted with his older class- 
mates in Company B ; but Captain Dj'er was unwil- 
ling to assume the responsibility of accepting so 
young a volunteer in the absence of his father, (then 
in active service with his regiment at Hilton Head, 
S. C.) But this did not dampen the ardor of 
young Metcalf, and we find him in October of the 
following year, a second lieutenant in his father's 



THE TENTH R. I. REGIMENT. 13 

regiment. He also creditably served as Post Adju- 
tant at Fort Pulaski, Georgia, till May 27, 1864, 
■when he was promoted to a first lieutenancy. But 
in the followhig August he was attacked by a mala- 
rial fever On the I'Jth of the mouth, seeming con- 
siderably better, he was removed for better care, to 
Beaufort, S. C. But there he gradually grew worse, 
and died on the 28th of August, in the seventeenth 
year of his age. ITis funeral was attended with full 
military honors. Though hardly a year in the 
army, he had won the respect of all his associates, 
and had earned one promotion in the field. Cut oif 
in the dew of youth, he has left a memory forever- 
more associated with the most unselfish patriotism 
and pure devotion to duty 

Those High School boys whose fortunate lot it was 
to be members of Captain Dyer's company, will 
hardly again find in life a day of such strange 
excitement as that in which they first put on uni- 
form and started for camp. 

Of the departure of the regiment, and the jour- 
ney to Washington, others have told. The same 
enthusiasm greeted the Tenth as all the Rhode Island 



14 THE HIGH SCHOOL I50YS OF 

regiments. Who can forget the hearty reception in 
Philadelphia, at the rooms of the Volunteer Relief 
Association, or we of the Second Detachment, the 
midnight march through Baltimore, the rebellious 
city? Everyman provided with several rounds of 
ball-cartridges, in case of trouble ! Arriving at 
length at the capitol, the I'egiment had an immediate 
taste of army life, in the repulsive fare and quarters 
of the Soldiers' Retreat ; but orders soon came to 
move, and on the 30th, an intensely hot day, marched 
to Tenallytown Village, six miles away, and went 
into camp. 

From this point of the narrative, in an attempt to 
revive the memories of our three months' adven- 
tures, from their Rip Van Winkle slumber of twenty 
yearg^ the writer has relied chiefly upon his old pack- 
age of letters, preserved by his mother, extracts from 
which are now given, substantial!}' as written. 

Camp Frieze, near Tenallytown, D. C, June 3d 
and 4th, 1862. "To-day is a rainy one in camp, 
and the boys are either asleep, writing home, or lie 
stretched out on the straw, so I thought I'd give an 
account of our whereabouts. Camp Frieze, named 



THE TENTH R. I. REGIMENT. 15 

in honor of the quartermaster-general of Rhode 
Island, is beautifully laid out in a grove of oak trees, 
with tents in parallel rows, and streets or avenues 
between. Ours is, of course, Dyer avenue. The 
Second ward company, D, have Benefit street. The 
Seventh ward company, Broadway, and the Sixth 
ward company, Atwood avenue, in honor of Mrs. 
Alice Atwood, of that ward, who made and pre- 
sented the men with one hundred pin-cushions, tilled 
with pins. William Grant and Ira Wilbur are in 
that company. The college boys of Co. B have 
named their quarters 'Hope College.' In our High 
School tent there are seventeen of us, as follows : 
4th Sergeant Charles L. Stafford, Corporal William 
P Vaughan, and high privates Edwin B. Fiske, John 
A. Reynolds, Frank Frost, James F. Field, George 
T.* and Nathan H. Baker,* John B. Kelly,* Frank F 
Tingley, Charles B. and Charles T. Greene, George 
H. Sparhawk, H. K. Blanchard, David Hunt, Jesse 
M. Bush and myself — all in one Sibley tent ! Ned. 
Glezen, Daniel Bush, Howard Sturges and Brock. 
Mathewson are in Co. D, and Zeph. Brown and Jesse 
Eddy in Co. K. We arrange ourselves round, at 

* Promoted to be corporals. 



16 THE HIGH SCHOOL BOYS OF 

night, like the spokes of :i wheel, with our feet, or, 
as the army shoes are termed, 'whangs,' to the cen- 
tre pole, around which our guns are stacked. We 
sleep on straw beds on the ground, spread our rub- 
ber blankets to keep otf the dampness, and make our 
knapsacks serve as pillows. The rations thus far 
have been horrid ; especially the meat, or 'salt horse' ; 
so that Frank Tingley and I have been out two or 
three times to get a good square meal, for only 
twentv-five cents, at a nei<rhboriug farm house. The 
surrounding hill tops are covered with forts and bat- 
teries. Near us are Forts Pennsylvania, Slocum and 
Franklin, which command the roads leading to Har- 
per's Ferry and Frederick City We are in General 
Sturgis's Division. Near us are the Sixty-third 
Indiana, the Fifty-ninth and Seventy-first New York, 
a Pennsylvania regiment, the Eleventh and Seven- 
teenth Regulars, the Ninth Rhode Island regiment, 
and the Tenth Rhode Island battery V{q have 
devotional services every night. (Quartermaster 
George Lewis Cooke is occupying the onl\' meet- 
ing-house of the village for onr stores, but we hear 
that it is to be cleared out for the chnplain the com- 



THK TENTH R. I. REGIJIENT. 17 

iug Sabbath. Last Sunday, as he had not arrived 
at camp, some of us got permission to go swim- 
ming, (not fishing,) in Rock Creek, near b}' We 
kept together, as the neighborhood is said to abound 
with Secesh. Close at hand was a grave-yard 
where several members of Union regiments were 
buried, who, report says, were shot while on picket 
duty. The picket guard fell to our company that 
very night, and I was glad I was not chosen, partly 
ou account of the lively thunder shower we had. 
Last night a fellow was brought in from the picket 
line who had stayed out too late, we believe, court- 
ing some fair F. F V At any rate, he had on 
light vest and pants, and came galloping along on 
horseback, when Fiske, one of our mess, jumped 
into the middle of the road, with bayonet at the 
charge, and yelled, 'Who goes there?' The rider 
jumped back in his stirrups and pulled up, badly 
frightened, exclaiming, 'It's m-m-me!' 'Advance 
me and give the countersign ! ' 'Twas no go, he 
had to give it up. ' Then you're ray prisoner,' says 
Fiske, and he had to go into camp with us for the 
rest of the night. 'Twas pretty rough, I'll admit, 
but I guess he'll keep better hours in future." 



18 THE HIGH SCHOOL BOYS OF 

June 10th. "I was handed your letter yesterday 
while washing the mess pans and cups. Two are 
detailed for this duty each day There's no fun in 
it. I never realized before how much easier it is to 
eat a good dinner, than to wash the dishes after- 
wards. We have now been sworn into the service 
of the United States. There could be no 'special 
service at Washington' put into it, or any conditional 
oath whatever, and we had the choice of taking it 
straight, or taking a free pass home. After the oath 
was administered by Adjutant-General Thomas, the 
customary ' three cheers for your flag, men,' were 
heartily given. We have the best captain in the 
regiment, and the right of the line. One of the 
hardest things I have found to do yet, is to get up 
early enough in the morning. Reveille comes at 
half-past four ! But Captain Dyer meant to wake us 
up the other day, and started us otf as soon as we 
were in line, on the double-quick. Now this is all 
very pretty, with a company of wide-awake soldiers 
on a level road, but a crowd of sleepy, drowsy, 
raw recruits, is very different material. We had not 
gone far, when unfortunate number one stumbled and 



THE TENTH R. I. REGIMENT. 19 

fell. Then jjraceful John Revnolds, of onr mess, 
followed, and in the vain attempt to leap over the 
back of number one, was rolled into a hollow by the 
roadside. Then number three displayed his soles, or 
'whangs,' to the rising sun, and so the fun went on, 
till order was finally restored, and we reached camp, 
as smiling and wide-awake a compan}' as Ehode 
Island could produce. 

"Joshua Addeman, of the college mess, has just left 
for home to deliver the class oration at Brown. 
Some of us would like to come and deliver a few at the 
High School, and make you a visit at the same time." 

A letter to the writer, from home, dated June 
I4th, says: "It was college exhibition, (class day,) 
Thursday, and the orator was a student named Ad- 
deman, who went out in your regiment. He got a 
leave of absence to come on and deliver his ora- 
tion, and then went back the same night. His sub- 
ject was 'The Alliance of Scholarship and Patriot- 
ism.' The audience cheered him like fun, I can tell 
you. But he looked kind o' gray, as though he was 
smelling 'salt horse' in the distance !" 

June 12th. "Last night was my first experience 



zO THE men SCHOOL uoys of 

'on picket.' Our squad marched do^vn a lonesome- 
looking road, about a mile and a half toward Fred- 
ericktown, and attempted to force an enti'ance into 
an old school-house by the roadside, but its barred 
shutters resisted all our efforts. We never felt so 
sorry at a school lock-out before I We marched fur- 
ther on, and took the best quarters we could get, in 
a wheelwright shop, opening to the road. I was on 
'the relief,' and had just got fairly into an uncomforta- 
ble snooze, when we were all suddenly startled by 
an alarm, and orders from the sergeant to buckle on 
equipments, right shoulder arms, and double-quick 
down the road for the picket line — all the work. of 
perhaps two or three minutes. Were we wide 
awake? Oh, yes, some, if not some scared! But 
the trouble was soon explained. Some drunken sol- 
diers from a neighboring regiment, were attempting 
to pass our line without the countersign. Order 
was soon restored, and we were glad to march back to 
quarters, with all the arms and legs we brought out. 
It must have been about four o'clock in the morning, 
when I found m3self posted as sentinel. I paced 
m\- beat, regularly, back and forth, «o^/<//;y cscapinir 



THE TENTH E. I, REGIMENT. 21 

my keen vision. Suddenly there came the sound of 
approaching wheels ; when, at the proper moment, 
with bayonet at the charge, and summoning all my 
voice to command, I called a ' Halt ! ' The occupant 
of the team proved to he an inoffensive fishmonger, 
on his way to Georgetown. He strongly protested, 
— and his fish still more strongly protested, against 
being interfered with — but with the help of a com- 
rade, I marched fish and fisherman into camp, 
accompanied by about as tall swearing as I ever 
listened to. The fact is, the neighborhood around 
here is considered unfriendly, and it is therefore 
necessary to strictly maintain our lines. 

June 13th. "When a box from home arrives at 
camp, the eatable portion of the contents, if sent to 
a High School boy, is considered the common prop- 
erty of the mess. When my box was opened, there- 
fore, the boys all gathered round me, and as each 
package was taken out, they set up a terrible yelling 
and howling ; whether they knew what was in it or 
not. You can guess the peanuts disappeared in 
double-quick time, and when I came to the lemons, 
there was 'tremendous applause and cheering in the 



2i THE HIGH SCHOOL BOYS OF 

' Sfalleries ! ' AVe not only had lots of fun over the 
box, but it was worth ahiiost its weight in gold, for 
it contained everything I wanted. The combined 
knife, fork and spoon will be very useful, and will 
allow my tingers to take a rest, as no army knives 
and forks have yet been issued. The towels, also, 
are just what I needed, as I've been trying to make 
that same poor, single towel go, for more than a 
fortnight ! You ought to have seen me skinning my 
fingers trying to wash it ! But relief has come at 
last, and the contrabands now come round regularly 
for any washing on hand. So I 'put mine out,' to 
the tune of six cents apiece for shirts, and so on. I 
never ate any ham which tasted so good as that in 
the box ; and we should have had small pieces if the 
whole High School mess had had it for dinner, for 
some of them are 'great feeders.' So it was aijreed, 
that as quite a squad was going to the Potomac for a 
swim, those who stayed at camp should have the 
ham ; and I tell you we enjoyed it, to the last 
hitch : " 

June 15th. "We have a promising addition to 
our mess, in (he foimof a young contraband, thirteen 



THE TENTH R. I. REGIMENT. 23 

years old, who boasts the name of Abraham Doug- 
lass. He has a nice voice, too, and has agreed to do 
our singing, and wash the dishes besides, for two 
dollars and fifty cents a month ! Cheap enough, 
isn't it? The boys enjoy the singing very much, 
and call little Abe out every night. One of his 
best sonsrs is : 



■ De gospel ship's a sailin' — sailin' — sailin' — 
De gospel ship's a sailin' — bound for Canin's happy she' ! 
Chokus. — Then glory, glory hallelujah, &c.' 

and another is : 

' Dare's a light in der winder fer thee, brudder, 
Dere's a light in der winder fer thee ! ' 

" One of our men wrote home : ' The boys have 
found a remedy for poor rations, in songs, which 
carry the mind back to the scenes of other days. 
Within reach of the buttery's guns, you may hear, 
rising on the air of evening, 'Jesus, lover of my soul,' 
or grand old Pleyel 's Hymn ! Here a band of students 
revive the memories of Brown with 'Lauriger Hora- 
tius,' ' Here's to good old Prex., drink him down ! ' 
or, ' We'll all go over to Seekonk ! ' while from the 



24 TIIF. moil SCHOOL HOYS OF 

other end of the camp, from the tents of the Ninth 
reo-iment, come the strains of 'Let me kiss him for 
his mother '" 

In looking over my little red-covered soldier's 
hymn book, presented to the members of the Tenth 
regiment, I find the following beantiful lines of "The 
Countersign," pasted on the inside of the front cover 
They were written by a private in Stuart's engineer 
regiment, and made a deep impression on my mind : 

" Halt! who goes there? " my challenge cry. 

It rings along the watchful line ; 
" Relief! " I hear a voice reply — 

"Advance, and give the countersign! " 
With bayonet at the charge, I wait — 

The corporal gives the mystic spell — 
With arms aport, I charge my mate : 

" Then onward pass, and all is well ! " 

But in the tent that night awake, 

I ask, if in the fray I fall, 
Can I the mystic answer make 

When th' angelic sentries call? 
And pray that heaven may so ordain. 

Where'er I go, wliat fate be mine, 
Whether in travail or in pain 

I still may have " the countersign ! " 



THE TENTH E. I. REGIMENT. 25 

"A few members of Ccach company are allowed, now 
and then, a pass to Washington, The other day, a 
party from Company B were sauntering down Penn- 
sylvania avenue, when a door opened across the 
street, and there stood General Burnside ! They all 
ran across, with one accord, to shake hands with 
him, on the score of being Rhode Island soldiers. 
The General extended a cordial greeting to all, and 
inquired where the regiment was stationed ; and the 
boys left him, feeling that this meeting alone, had 
amply repaid them for their tramp to Washington." 

A few months later, after the battle of Antietam, 
young Adjutant William Ide Brown, a student of 
Brown University, (afterwards mortally wounded 
before Richmond,) thus wrote home of Burnside : 
"O, how I love that General ! I would think myself 
happy if I could be an orderly, and follow him from 
place to place. How I wish I knew him personal!}' ! 
How proud I was to have him speak to me on the 
night of the battle of Antietam, where I was on 
duty at the famous Antietam bridge ! There may be 
ofreater ijenerals than Burnside, but nowhere a more 
honest, noble, patriotic hero ! " 

3 



2() THE HIGH SCHOOL boys of 

Camp Frieze, June 18th. " Yeyterdiiy afternoon, 
Company B was thrown into quite a flutter of ex- 
citement, by the announcement that it had been de- 
tailed for a secret expedition, and was under march- 
ing orders. We left camp at two o'clock, P- m., 
accompanied by the regimental officers, with direc- 
tions to observe the strictest silence on the way 
What was going to happen? Had old Stonewall 
Jackson or Jeff. Davis ventured within our lines, 
and were the High School boys of Company B to 
have the glory of the capture ?" Unhappily it proved 
not, though Stonewall did make a visit to Mary- 
land a few months later, and his progress, and 
that of the entire rebel army, was arrested only at 
the terrific pass of Antietam, but sixty miles from 
camp. "After Company B had been marched perhaps 
two miles, it was halted, and faced, as the boys say, 
'eyes right and left,' before a peaceful and unpre- 
tending mansion, and awaited an answer to the sum- 
mons of Colonel Bliss at the front door. It seems 
that intelligence had reached camp that a rebel can- 
non was concealed on the premises, (a noted ren- 
dezvous for rebel sympathizers,) and it was con- 



THE TENTH R. I, REGIMENT. 27 

siderecl not improbable that they might turn it to 
their advantage some dark night, on our sleeping regi- 
ment at Camp Frieze. It was altogether a very serious 
piece of business, the boys thought, on hearing the 
news, and visions of thirty-two, if not forty-two, 
pounders rose before us. The summons for surren- 
der, however, was met by an indignant refusal from 
the fair matron who answered the call, which was 
warmly seconded by the old farmer himself, who 
now appeared from a neighboring field. He had 
been observed by some of us to be making off, but 
was induced to return, after a short chase by Adju- 
tant Tobey And now a daughter appeared on the 
scene, fresh from school, and a true 'gray,' and no 
mistake. She loudly declared that they would never 
give it up. No, never ! But the choice being now 
given to surrender it, or take up a family march back 
to camp, to the tune of ' we won't go home till morn- 
ing,' they concluded to produce the gun. And lo, 
what a disappointment ! Instead of a mighty forty- 
two pounder, or Stonewall Jackson, we beheld a small 
field howitzer, such as is used in the field by infan- 
try , and carrying a two-inch rifled ball, with efifect, per- 



28 THE HIGH SCHOOL BOYS OF 

haps ii distance of two miles. But such as it was, it was 
uiouiited on its carriage and trailed back to camp hy 
Company B, who thus earned the honor of capturing 
the onli/ rebel cannon taken \)y the Tenth regiment, 
Ehode Island volunteers I" It is now in the posses- 
sion of Rodman Post, G A. R., in Providence. 

June 27th. Seminary Hill, Fairfax County, \'n- 
ginia. "As per orders, we broke up our old camp 
shortly after midnight, yesterday morning. It was 
a grand sight, as the beautiful grove, with its stately 
oaks and tented avenues, was suddenly illuminated 
with huge fires, as if by magic. The long rows of 
glistening bayonets shone up and down the camp. 
The sparks filled the air and shot upward to the sky. 
And the scene, with the men hurrying to and fro, 
shouting and laughing ; the falling tents, and the 
rumble of wagons moving off with stores and bag- 
gaire, was one not soon to be for2:otten. As for the 
High School bo3's, they were everjwhere present, 
superintendiug ever} thing, as];ing questions, and in 
every way helping on the excitement. By ten o'clock 
the regiment Avas in Washington, and, passing over 
Long Bridge, was soon on Yiiginia soil. 



THE TENTH R. I. REGIMENT. 29 

"The day was oppressively hot, but we tramped ou 
to Alexandria, and thence to this place. Our section 
kept together to the end of the march, but I was 
so completely used up on reaching camp, that after 
getting a refreshing drink of water at Fort Ward, 
near by, I dropped on my rubber blanket and dropped 
off to sleep in less than two minutes. One of the 
boys wrote home that the length of this march had 
been variously estimated, according to the length of 
limb and strength of muscle employed, ranging from 
eighteen miles (about the actual distance) to thirty, 
and even forty ; while Corporal Stump declared that 
he must have marched, at least, a hundred and fifty 
miles ! Somebody innocently asked the Corporal on 
the way, what regiment it was, and he promptly re- 
sponded ' the one hundred and tenth Rhode Island ! ' 
After the long tramp and short rest, we had to pitch 
our tents, the same night, on what appeared to be a 
vast ash-heap ; to distinguish it from Camp Frieze it 
has been designated Camp Scorch. There is no 
shade whatever. The plain, as well as the surrounding 
hill-tops, have all been cleared of foliage and crowned 
with the inevitable fort. The country has been even 



80 THE HIGH SCHOOL BOYS OF 

stripped of its fences and hedges to remove every 
cover for the enemy. Everything has a grim, ravaged 
look, as far as yon can see. Our regiment now 
forms part of a division of the reserve army corps, 
south of the Potomac. Corporal Nathan Baker went 
out on a little foraging expedition yesterday after- 
noon, and calling me out, on his return, displayed a 
single, solitary gaunt-looking chicken. It was safe- 
ly landed in the High School tent, and in due time 
Corporal William Vaughan undertook to construct a 
chicken stew for the whole mess. He said he could 
do it, and he had never failed us on good coffee ; but 
it proved to be 'foul play' in this case. He pro- 
ceeded to fill one of our large iron mess buckets with 
water, prepared and placed the chicken therein ; for 
seasoning, he used up about all our stock of pepper 
and salt ; and after so many minutes by the watch, 
and a x^retended tasting, pronounced dinner ready 
So we all fell in, and each had his share, as he 
thought, uvdrdy seasoned ; for each immediately 
passed his cup along to the next victim, with a Avry 
face. There was plenty of stew for all, and some 
left for the college boys. Our cook says, 'next time 
draw a little lesa water, and move chicken I ' " 



THE TENTH R. I. REGIMENT. 31 

Fort Pennsylvania, July 1st. "It seems the Tenth 
Rhode Island was not destined to long remain at 
Camp Scorch, in Virginia, or to further continue its 
march to the front. On Monday, June 30th, orders 
came assigning it to garrison duty in the seven forts 
and three batteries, protecting the capitol on the 
northwest ; and relieving the Fifty-ninth New York 
Artillery, ordered to the Peninsula to join McClellan. 
Accordingly, on Monday, the 30th, our faces were 
turned back towards Alexandria, from whence we em- 
barked for Washington, arriving a little after sunset. 
At half-past ten, p. m., the regiment took up its 
night march for Fort Pennsylvania, six miles away, 
near our old camp, arriving at about two o'clock, 
A. M. As the tents could not be unloaded from the 
vessel till daylight, the regiment was obliged to bi- 
vouac near the fort, without cover Fortunately, I 
was in a detail of men left at Washington with the 
baggage and stores at the vessel. Sleep, however, 
was difficult among the boxes, and barrels, and 
smells, in the hold of the schooner. After every- 
thing was put ashore, next day, two of us started 
for camp in charge of a provision wagon, which we 



32 THE HIGH .SCHOOL BOYS OF 

took full possession of, ;ind were fools enough to 
stuff ourselves with the Bologna sausages, greas}' 
cookies and pies, with which it was burdened — and 
which burdened us, also, after getting to camp, with 
severe headaches and loathing for sutlers' pies and 
sweetmeats. But we are all right again, now. You 
must remember we were very hungry The regi- 
ment has been distributed as follows : Companies B 
and K, Captains Dyer and Low, Fort Pennsylva- 
nia, regimental headquarters ; Company D, Captain 
Smith, Fort DeRussey ; Company A, Captain Taber, 
Fort Franklin ; Companies E and I, Captains Cady 
and Hale, Fort Alexander; Company H, Captain 
Duckworth, Batteries Vermont and Martin Scott; 
Company C, Captain Vose, Fort Cameron ; Compa- 
ny F, Captain Harris, Fort Ripley ; Company G, 
Captain A. Crawford Greene, Fort Gaines." 

Washington, July 3, 1862. Headquarters Army- 
of Virginia. "Don't be startled because I've turned 
up in another new locality Yesterday, while sitting 
in my tent, I was summoned to officers' quarters, 
and informed that Charles AVildman, of Company D, 
and myself, were to be detached on special service. 



THE TENTH R. I. REGIMENT. 33 

at army headquarters in Washington. It seems tliat 
General Pope, from the West, has been appointed 
Commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, 
which is to include the forces of Fremont, Banks, 
Sturgis, and McDowell taken from McClellan. 
Clerks and orderlies are needed at the new head- 
quarters, and are being detailed from the regiments 
around here. So, after bidding the boys good-bye, 
we left camp yesterday afternoon for Washington, in 
an ambulance wagon, with orders to report to Colo- 
nel George D. Ruggles, Chief of Staff at the War 
Department. We arrived there in a drenching rain, 
about four o'clock, but it being past business hours 
we were obliged to go twice, to hunt up Colonel 
Euggles at his residence. We finally received an 
order on General Wadsworth, who referred us to 
the Superintendent of the Soldiers' Retreat, fully two 
miles awa}', and no umbrellas furnished, either. Re- 
membering our hard experience at the Retreat, we 
concluded to retreat to the W^ar Department, where 
the janitor, an Irishman, very obligingly offered us 
a night's lodging, which we were glad to accept, 
you'd better believe ! After a good square meal 



34 THE HIGH SCHOOL BOYS OF 

(just for a change) at a restaurant near by, we had 
the pleasure on returning, of seeing, for the first 
time, President Lincohi himself, in company with 
Senator Sumner While sitting in the corridor, in 
the evening, we saw also Mr. Welles, Secretary of 
the Kavy, with his long, white beard. Meunwhile 
our friend, the night-porter, had obtained permission 
for us to pass the night in Adjutant-General Thom- 
as's office, which we agreed was splendid luck. So 
that I can report that I slept soundly last night, in 
the office of Uncle Sam's adjutant-general, which is 
more than every boy of seventeen can say We are 
now at Headquarters No. 232, G street, in good 
health and spirits. We think we shall like our du- 
ties first-rate. It is a good place to see the leading 
military men. General Sturgis, commanding the 
District troops, and General N P Banks, called to- 
day. General Pope was also at the office in citizen's 
dress. We are to sleep at headquarters to receive 
night dispatches, and take our meals close l)y To- 
morrow is the Fourth of July How I would enjoy 
spending it at home ! But here we are till the last 
of August. As there will be no public celebration 



THE TENTH R. I. REGIMENT. 35 

here, we will have a chance to look about Washing- 
ton, and are promised passes from General Pope 
which will give us 'the freedom of the city ' Quite a 
privilege for high privates, we think." 

July 6th. "Copied to-day, from the original, a 
long letter from General Pope to McClellan, at Har- 
rison's Lauding, which concludes by saying that he 
will be ready to co-operate, in every possible way, 
with any future movements of the Army of the Po- 
tomac. Also a dispatch to General Banks, stating 
'that the critical condition of affairs near Richmond, 
renders it highly probable that the rebels will ad- 
vance on Washington in force.'" 

July 15th. " General Pope is making arrange- 
ments to take the field. I copied, yesterday, from 
the original, for the government printing office, an 
important address to the army, of which I enclose 
an official copy Colonel Ruggles, Chief of Staff, 
read it at the office this morning, and it was pro- 
nounced just about right." 

Note. — In view of the notoriety which this proclamation has attained, on 
account of General Pope's subsequent disasters, together with its admirable 
qualities for High School declamation, it is printed in full on the following page. 



3(5 THE HIGH SCHOOL BOYS OF 



GENERAL POPE'S PRO C L A JI ATI O X 

"Headquarters Army of Virgixia, 

Washington, D. C, July 14, 1862. 
"To The Officers and Soldiers of the Army of Virginia: 

" By special assignment of the President of the United States, I have as- 
sumed the command of this army. I have spent two weeks in learning your 
whereabouts, your condition, and your wants; in preparing you for active ope- 
rations, and in placing you in positions from which you can act promptly and 
to the purpose. These labors are nearly completed, and I am about to join you 
in the field. 

" Let us understand each other. I have come to you from the West, where 
we have always seen the backs of our enemies; from an army whose business 
it has been to seek the adversary and to beat him when he was found ; whose 
policy has been attack and not defence. In but one instance has the enemy 
been able to place our western armies in defensive attitude. I presume that I 
have been called here to pursue the same system, and to lead you against the 
enemy. It is my purpose to do .so, and that speedily. I am sure you long for 
an opportunity to win the distinction you are capable of achieving. That op- 
portunity I shall endeavor to give you. Meantime I desire you to dismiss from 
your minds certain phrases which I am sorry to find much in vogue amongst 
you. I hear constantly of taking ' strong positions and holding them,' of 
' lines of retreat,' and of ' bases of supplies.' Let us discard such ideas. 
The strongest position a soldier should desire to occupy is one from which he 
can most easily advance against the enemy. Let us study the probable lines of 
retreat of our opponents, and leave our own to take care of themselves. Let 
us look before us, and not behind. Success and glory are in the advance; dis- 
aster and shame lurk in the rear. Let us act on this understanding, and it is 
safe to predict that your banners shall be inscribed with many a glorious deed, 
and that your names will be dear to your countrymen forever. 

.lN(i. Pope, Major-Gciieral Commanding." 



THE TENTH E. I. REGIMENT. 37 

July 19th, Saturday. "We expect to leave Wash- 
ington for the front, next Tuesday or Wednes- 
day. The longer we remain, the smaller our chance 
of going with headquarters, if we return with the 
regiment, as our time expires in about five weeks. 
Have been out on horseback to Fort Pennsylvania to 
see the boys. Their time seems to be pretty well 
used up between learning heavy artillery drill, gar- 
risoning old forts and building new ones. They 
were all glad to see me. They had received a box 
from the Ellsworth Phalanx, Captain D. W Lyman, 
filled with good things, which was greatly appre- 
ciated." " Wildman and I have been called out, 
by General Pope, on the charge of appropriating 
his fancy cigars ! We finally got in a successful 
rejoinder by proving that we didn't smoke. Pope is 
very violent and profane, at times. This was one of 
the times ! Now, General Sturgis was the cigar-for- 
ao-er We have seen him walk in and take a handful 
at a time ; but we thought that was A^s business." 

July 23, Wednesday, 9 p. m. "'All quiet on the 
Potomac !' I have had my bunk in the back room, 
on top of an old shoe-case. I rolled off, last night, 



38 THE HIGH SCHOOL BOYS OF 

mid jumped up, thinking we were attacked ! But we 
found it was only a little change of base, and that we 
were still in Washington. Colonel Kuggles says 
that arrangements to leave, cannot be completed he- 
fore FrJdaj', 25th instant. General Burnside called 
the other day Also saw Hon. "William H. Sew^nrd, 
Secretary of State. General Pope is becoming vexed 
and impatient at the continued delays. His letters 
and dispatches are harder than ever to make out. 
One to President Lincoln, the other day, said : 'I 
am becoming anxious and uneasy to join my com- 
mand in the field.' His reputation for braggadocio 
is well illustrated by the following Western story : 
A sick and wounded soldier was carried to the resi- 
dence of General Fisk, in St. Louis, after the battle 
and rebel evacuation of Corinth, where General Pope 
reported he had taken ten thousand prisoners. On 
a Sunday afternoon General Fisk was reading to the 
wounded soldier, from First Samuel, thirtieth chap- 
ter, an account of the tirst contraband. He was the 
servant of an Amalekite, who came into David's 
camp, and proposed, if assured of freedom, to show 
Ihe King of Israel a route which would enable him 



THE TENTH R. I. REGIMENT. 39 

to surprise his foe. The promise was given, and the 
King fell upon the enemy, whom he utterly de- 
stroyed. While the host was reading the list of the 
spoils — the prisoners, slaves, women, flocks and 
herds, captured by King David, the sick man looked 
up, and in his weak voice, piped out : ' Stop, Gene- 
ral ; just look down to the bottom of that list, and 
see if it isn't signed, John Pope, Major-General 
Commanding !' But so far as I can judge, he is the 
right man in the right place. There will be lively 
times when he takes the field. Four prisoners of 
the rebel cavalry were at headquarters, yesterday, 
for examination. They were a rough-looking set — 
none dressed alike. The stuff they wore, looked just 
like that old bagging up in the attic. Were they 
scared? Not any, I can tell you; neither would 
they give any information, but wanted to know how 
soon they could be exchanged, as they would like to 
get right back into the rebel array One of them, 
an adjutant of the First Virginia Cavalry, said to us, 
'it will take the North a right Jong while to whip the 
South.' It isn't so easy a job as it looked to be. It 
don't look much like getting to Richmond at present." 



40 THE HIGH SCHOOL BOYS OF 

July 30th. neadquarters Array of Virginia, in the 
Field, Warrenton, Va. " We arrived here yesterday 
afternoon. I was hardly tit to come, on account of 
a severe attack of malaria, with t^'phoid tendency 
at one time. But I was in good hands. The head- 
quarters surgeon looked after my ease, and I was 
very kindly cared for b}' a lady, who said I reminded 
her of an absent brotjier — a fortunate thing for me, 
wasn't it? But when I found that headquarters were 
really off, I insisted on going, also. So, here I am, in 
Warrenton, right side up, I guess, only a little the 
worse for wear. It took us about two hours to get 
here, via Alexandria, Manassas and Catlett's Station. 
The road was very rough, and the cars very rickety. 
Headquarters are established at the Young Ladies' 
Seminary, a large brick building, pleasantly located. 
Our office is in the main school-room, and we now 
occupy the school desks. I hardly expected to at- 
tend school 'down in old Virginny !' As everything 
here is contraband of war, we went throuarh the 
desks this morning, in search of information for Gen- 
eral Pope, and I am sorry to have to report, from 
the correspondence captured, that the young ladies 
who attend school here are very rebellious. The let- 



THE TENTH K. I. REGIMENT. 41 

ters were all written like the inclosed, on coarse 
brown wrapping-paper. I'm inclined to think they 
suspected whose hands tliey would fall into, for one, 
after enlarging on her music lessons and a recent 
serenade, says she hopes the Yankees won't get her 
letters ! while another, to 'My Dear Eloise,' is still 
more pathetic. She says : 'That was a very sad ac- 
cident, was it not, which happened to our beloved 
General Ashby ? It does seem as though all our dis- 
tinguished men were being taken ! Oh ! if we could 
only have J9^ece once more! how delightful it would 
be ! ' A letter captured by my comrade Wildman, was 
signed, Hattie P. Beauregard, Corinth, Miss." The 
Eebel prints contained notes like the following, which 
show the spirit of Southern women: "Messrs. Edi- 
tors, — I see that General Beauregard has called for 
bells to be manufactured into cannon. Cannot the 
ladies assist by sending all their bell-metal preserv- 
ing-kettles ? I send mine, as a beginning. — A South- 
ern Woman." One other : "Gentlemen, — I send you 
the lead weight which was attached to the striking 
part of our clock, with the hope that every woman 
in the whole confederacy will do likewise." "Great 



42 THE HIGH SCHOOL BOYS OF 

bodies of our troops are constantly passing through 
here for Culpepper. The roads are all blocked with 
them. The people here are unfriendly, and openly 
express their disloyal sentiments. They would like 
to hang Pope." 

But the poor state of my health now demanded 
serious attention. Not having entirely recovered 
from a fever, on leaving Washington, hard travel- 
ling, hard work at my desk, and unsuitable food for 
one in my condition, soon brought about a change 
for the worse. So that, when headquarters were 
further moved forward, August 2d, on recommenda- 
tion of the surgeon, I was ordered back to Washing- 
ton by Colonel Ruggles, for proper care. It was a bit- 
ter disappointment, I remember, to be left behind, and 
witness the gay departure of officers and comrades, 
as they rode rapidly away towards Sperry ville ; but 
subsequent events proved it to be a kind Providence 
which interposed in my behalf. From that day Gen- 
eral Pope's headquarters were chiefly in the saddle. 
Three weeks later, August 23d, they were back at 
Catlett's Station, only thirty-five miles from Wash- 
ington, where a midnight dash was made upon them 



THE TENTH R. I. REGIMENT. 43 

by the rebel cavalry ; and the week following, or 
on the 2d of September, after fifteen days of fight- 
ing and retreating, the broken remnants of the once 
proud armies of Virginia were back Avithin the de- 
fences of Washington. 

August 2d, the day that the writer left General 
Pope's headquarters at Warrenton, my comrade Wild- 
man wrote me, in the evening, from Sperryville : " We 
ai-e encamped in a splendid place in the woods ; have 
wall tents, and only three in a tent. We shall fare 
well, as we are to have a colored cook from the cav- 
alry. By the order just issued, we expect to come 
in contact with old Stonewall Jackson pretty soon." 
Again, on the 9th, writing from Culpepper, he says : 
" We arrived here yesterday We went about a mile 
from the town, and opened headquarters at a large 
house on a farm. Of course you remember General 
Pope's address : ' We, in the West, have always seen 
the hacks of our enemies ! Let us look before, and 
not behind us ! No modes of retreat,' etc. But I 
notice that toe retreated last night, on the double- 
quick, without stopping to look behind us ! Old 
Stoiiewall was within three and a half miles of head- 



44 THE HIGH SCHOOL BOYS OF 

quarters yesterday, and I tell you we just pulled up 
stakes and travelled for Culpepper a humming. AYe 
went way beyond the town, and had just got things 
into shape, and tents up, when troop after troop of 
cavalry came down the road pell-mell, till in a few 
minutes it was completely blocked with them. Come 
to find out, Jackson had crossed the Eapidan in force, 
and driven in our pickets, and we, having cavalry 
only, and he plenty of artillery, we were obliged to 
retire in a hurry On the way back, we met the 
brigades going out. They appeared full of fight, 
and some were singing and laughing. There are be- 
tween twenty and thirty thousand of our troops." 

August 16th, from headquarters near Cedar Moun- 
tain, he wrote : — "On Saturday afternoon, the 9th, 
the ball opened here. It was a terrific encounter. 
General Banks bravely held his ground against a 
vastly superior force of the rebels. Our loss was 
over fifteen hundred, killed, wounded and missing. 
General Pope and staff arrived on the field about 
seven, p. m. They would not let the clerks go, but 
I went out in the evening with the surgeons. I shall 
never forget that night. There were hundreds and 



THE TENTH R. I. REGIMENT. 45 

himdreds of wounded. The battle was over, but an 
artillery fire was kept up till midnight. I went out 
again on Tuesday last, 12th instant, and saw the old 
devils, just as the last of them skedaddled for the 
Rapidan. I came near getting my old head knocked 
off, too. I tell you that Avas quite a little fight. 
Colonel Euggles had a horse shot under him. Colo- 
nel Morgan, who signed your last pass, got a bullet 
through his hat, and, in fact, Pope and the whole 
staflTcame near being captured. We move again to- 
morrow, to the Rapidan. We now have a colored 
cook, and have ordered cooking utensils forwarded 
from Washington." But on that very day, the 16th 
of August, a party of rebel cavalry was captured 
near by, informing General Pope, through an auto- 
graph letter of General Lee's, that the latter was 
moving northward, by forced marches, with the en- 
tire rebel army of Richmond, to attack him. In 
consequence of this information. General Pope has- 
tily broke up his camps on the Rapidan and retired to 
a position behind the north branch of the Rappahan- 
nock, in the hope that by holding the fords, suffi- 
cient time would be gained for the Army of the Poto- 



46 THE HIGH SCHOOL BOYS OF 

mac to reinforce him. Unhappily this result utterly 
failed. On Friday evening, August 22d, General 
Pope's train and headquarters were back at Catlett's 
Station, within thirty-five miles of \A'ashingtou, where 
a night attack was made by a body of Stonewall 
Jackson's cavahy, under General Stuart. It was a 
complete surprise, and met Avith only slight resist- 
ance. My comrade Wildman, of the Tenth regi- 
ment, who was there, said that they were betrayed 
by a contraband who had been supplied with food 
the day before. Thus guided, the rebels moved 
silently forward to the very tents of Pope's officers, 
and poured in a deadly volley Some were killed on 
both sides. In the darkness and confusion which 
followed, many escaped ; but the raiders captured 
over two hundred prisoners, a still greater number 
of the General's horses, his personal baggage, in- 
cluding his uniform, and everything belonging to his 
staff officers. One of the stall' was captured, and 
also one of the clerks. As for my friend Wildman, 
he was only too glad to get off alive. But he had a 
rough time, and a hard tramp through the mud, rain 
and darkness, to reach a place of safety The raid- 



THE TENTH R. I. REGIMENT. 47 

ers retired to Warrenton, Pope's headquarters only 
three weeks before, and were received with ovations 
by the people. The bells were rung, a procession 
formed, and a contraband, arrayed in General Pope's 
uniform, was paraded on horseback through the 
streets. 

At the time of the departure of the Tenth Rhode 
Island for home, a few days after, August 25th, it 
was believed that the armies of Generals Pope and 
McClellan had safely effected a junction near Manas- 
sas ; that the emergency had passed, and that the 
united armies of Virginia would soon be in a posi- 
tion to resume the offensive. The regiment's term 
of service had not only expired, but not less than 
seventy-five of the men, including Coloael Bliss, had 
left to join the new Seventh regiment. Others were 
to receive commissions, or would re-enlist in the 
new colored battalion being recruited at Providence. 
My comrade Wildman rejoined the regiment on its 
homeward journey, at Washington, and as he told 
the story of his adventures and escape, in the night 
attack on Pope's headquarters, he was the centre of 
interest. He thought the clerks' order "for cooking 



48 THE HIGH SCHOOL BOYS OF 

"utensils, at Cedar Mountain," might safely be coun- 
termanded, and was willing to let General Pope's 
"lines of retreat" "take care of themselves I" 

The Tenth regiment arrived home on the steamer 
Bay State, from Elizabethport, N. J., on the morn- 
ing of the 28th of August. It was received with a 
national salute, and escorted to Exchange Place, 
where it was dismissed to the various armories. 
Company B was entertained in the Fourth Ward 
drill-room in the Calender building, with generous 
hospitality The students especially appreciated the 
words of welcome from President Sears, of Brown 
University- The High School bo^-s were afterward 
given a rousing reception by the Ellsworth Phalanx, 
Captain Lyman, in High School hall, where, if 
the writer remembers, there were some rude at- 
tempts at oratory On Sunday evening, August 
31st, the regiment attended divine service at the Be- 
neficent Congregational church, Avhcre interesting 
addresses were delivered by our chaplain, the i^astor 
of the church. Rev Mr Clapp ; Dr. Hitchcock, and 
others. On Monday, September 1st, 1802, the 



THE TENTH R. I. REGIMENT. 49 

regiment was mustered out of service, and its mili- 
tary record closed. 

Of the students of Company B, Captain Elisha 
Dyer afterwards wrote: "They proved themselves 
worthy of the sacred cause for which they enlisted. 
For no delinquency or misdemeanor did any name 
of theirs ever find a place on the morning report. 
Always prompt, obedient and efficient, they won for 
themselves an honorable record." 

And in his final report to the Governor, Colonel 
Shaw says : "The character and conduct of the men 
were all that could be desired. The guard house was 
almost a useless institution. We were permitted to 
perform but an humble part in the great struggle 
for all that we hold most dear ; but I hope that that 
part was well done, and that it will meet your ap- 
proval, and the approval of the citizens of our hon- 
ored State." 

[Read before the Society, February 14, 1882.] 



|ln ^(jmoviam 



ROLL OF STUDENTS OF THE PROVIDENCE HIGH SCHOOL 

WHO 

LOST THEIR LIVES IX THE SERVICE OF THEIR COUNTRY DURING 
THE REBELLION. 



Note. The year given is, in all cases, that of enter 

MuNROE H. Gladding, 

Francis B. Ferris, 

William Ware Hall, - - - 

John P. Shaw, 

George W. Field, . . - 

James H. Earle, - - - 

Howard Greene, . . - 

George Wheaton Cole, - 

Samuel Foster, 2d, 

Jesse Comstock, . - - 

J. Nelson Bogman, . . . 

Petek Hunt, . . - 

Willia:m F. Atwood, - - - 

Benjamin E. Kelly, 

Charles M. Lathaim, 

Frederick Metcalf, 

Eugene F. Granger. 



ing the scliool. 


Class of 1843 


' 


' 1845 




' 1845 


' 


' 1847 




' 1849 


' 


' 1850 




' 1852 


' 


' 1853 




' 1853 


' 


' 1855 




' 1858 




' 1858 




' 1859 


' 


' 1859 




' 1859 


' 


' 1861 




' 1863 



52 THE HIGH SCHOOL 



ROLL OF TEACHERS AND STUDENTS 

OF THE PROVIDENCE HIGH SCHOOL WHO SERA'ED IX THE ARMY 
OR XAVY OF THE CXITED STATES DURIXG THE REBELLIOX'. 



Note. The year given is, in all cases, that of entering the school. 

TEACHERS. 

Edward H. Hall, (of Clas.s of 1843, and Assistant 
Teacher, 1854) 

Chaplain 44th Massachusetts Volunteers. 

William A. Moatoy, (Teacher English Dep't. 1858-1864). 
Captain Company K, 11th Rhode Island Volunteers, October 
1, 1862— July 13, 1863. 

Samuel Thurder, (of Class of 1849, and Teacher Junior 
and Classical Departments, 1859-1865) 

Private Company I, 11th Ehode Island Volunteers, October 
1, 1862; Second Lieutenant Company K, November 3; First 
Lieutenant ilarch 26, — July 13, 1863. 

Johx J. Ladd, (Teacher Classical Dep't, 1859-1864). 

Paymaster, with rank of Major, Ohio Volunteers. 
Alphonse Rexaud, (Teacher of French, 1860-1864). 

Sergeant Troop G, 3d Rhode Island Cavalry, March 14, 1864— 
November 29, ISGo. 

Aloxzo Williams, (Assistant Teacher, 1869-1870). 

Private Company A, Tliird Rhode Island Heavy Artillery, 
September 6, 1861 ; Corporal, June 1, 1S62; Serj;eaut, January 
1, lS(i:;; (,)uartcrmaster-Sergeant and First Sergeant Battery 
A,.3d Rhode Island Heavy Artillery, isiu ; Second Lieuten- 
ant, July 6, 186.5. On detached service in 1863, as gunner in 
Tnited States Navy. Mustered out August 4, 1865. 



IN THE CIVIL WAR. 53 



STUDENTS. 

ENTERED IN CLASS OF 1843. 

Edward Aborn, 

Private Company D, 1st Bhode Island Volunteers, May 30, — 
August 2, 1861. Private Company D, 10th Rhode Island 
Volunteers, May 26, — September 1, 1862. Second Lieutenant 
Company D, 14th Rhode Island Heavy Artillery, (colored,) 
September 28, 1863. Resigned January 22, 1865. 

James H. Armington, 

Second Lieutenant Company D, and Quartermaster, 10th 
Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26,— September 1, 1862. 

Martix P, Buffum, 

Private Company C, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2, 
1861. Discharged May 31, for disability. First Lieuten- 
ant, September 17, and Captain Company B, 4th Rhode Island 
Volunteers, October 30, 1861. Major, October4, 1862. Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel, December 24, 1862. Taken prisoner July 30, 
1864, in attack on fortifications before Petersburg; released 
December 8, 1864; mxistered out December 17, 1864. Brevet 
Colonel March 13, 1865. Lieutenant-Colonel 9th Veteran 
Regiment 1st Army Corps, June 1, 1865. Second and First 
Lieutenant and Captain IStli United States Infantry, 1866. 
Since resigned. 

William S. Chace, 

Second Lieutenant Company E, 4th Regiment, Rhode Island 
Volunteers, October 30, 1861. Captain, November 20, 1861. 
Severely vronnded, March 14, 1862, at the battle of Newbern, 
N. C. Resigned July 18, 1862. First Lieutenant Hospital 
Guards, Rhode Island Volunteers, November 12, 1862 — 
August 26, 1865. 

Charles H. Dunham, 

Orderly Sergeant, Company C, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, 
May 2, — August 2, 1861. Appointed Captain Company D, 
10th Rhode Island Volunteers. Resigned. 



54 niK HIGH sCllOilL 

Cyrus G. Dyek, 

Quartermaster 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2, ISiU. 
Captain 2d Rhode Island Volunteers, June 5, 1861. Major 
12th Rhode Island Volunteers, -October 17, 1SG2. Wounded 
December 1"., 1802, at Fredericksburg, and raustcrod out 
July 2'Jtli, ISGo, Captain 2(ith United States Colored Troops. 

]Mltnroe H. Gladding, 

Private Company C, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2, — 
August 2, 18!;i. (Quartermaster, .")th Rhode Island "\'olun- 
teers, January, 18i)2. On leave of absence, and died at 
Beaufort, S. C, October i, 18(;2. 

Edwaed H. Hall, (also Assistant Teacher in Higli Sciiool 
1854) 

Chaplain 44th ^Massachusetts Volunteers. 

Hexry K. Putter, 

Corporal Company C, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2, — 
August 2, 1861. Sergeant Company A, 11th Rhode Island 
Volunteers, October 1, 18:i2— July i::, 18(;;>. 

James Shaw. Jr., 

Lieutenant-Colonel lOtli Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
1802. Colonel, August 6 to September 1, 18(!2. Lieutenant- 
Colonel 12th Rhode Island Volunteers, December 31, 1802, 
to July 21), 1803. Colonel 7th United States Colored Troops, 
October 27, 1863. Commanding 1st Brigade, 3d Division 
10th Army Corps; 1st Brigade, 2d Division 25th Army Corps. 
Mustered out November 16, 18(;i;. Brevet Brigadier-General, 
Jlarch 13, 1805. 

Samuel B. Tobey, 

Lieutenant and (Quartermaster 3d New York Heavy Artillery. 

CLASS OF 1844. 

Nathax S. K. Davis, 

Sergeant Company K, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, ^lay 26, 
— September 1, 1862. 



IN THE CIVIL WAR. 55 

Joseph P. Mantox, 

Volunteer attached to Carbineers with 1st Rhode Island Vol- 
unteers at Battle of Bull Run, July 21, 1861. Colonel and 
Aid-de-Camp on Staff of Governor William Sprague. 

Charles H. Mumford, 

First Lieutenant Company I, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, 
May 26, — September 1, 1862. First Lieutenant Company C, 
nth Rhode Island Heavy Artillery, (colored,) 1863. Resigned 
for disability, July 20, 1864. 



CLASS OF 1845. 
Daniel T. A. Bowler. 

William E. Cutting, 

Corporal Company D, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2, — 
August 2, 1861. 

WiNTHROP DeWoLF, 

Private Company C, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, June li, — 
August 2, 1861. Private Company D, and Quartermaster 
10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May, 1862. Captain Company 
D, August 1,— September 1, 1862. 

Francis B. Ferris, 

Captain Company I, 12th Illinois Volunteers, April 25, 1861. 
Mortally wounded April 6, 1862, at the battle of Shiloh, and 
died April 18, 1862, at Paducah, Ky. 

William Ware Hall, 

First Lieutenant Company B, 5th Regiment Rhode Island 
Heavy Artillery, 1861. Resigned in summer of 1862. Teacher 
to the Freedmen in 1863 and 1864. Died of disease con- 
tracted in the service, July 1, 1864. 



0(i THE HIGH .SCHOOL 

Richard G. Shaw, 

Captain Company D, 3fl Rhode Island Volunteers, August 27, 
18(31. Resigned January 1.3, lSii4:. Major, 14th Rhode Island 
Heavy Artillery, (colored,) January 31, 1864,— October 2, 
1865. Second Lieutenant and First Lieutenant 1st United 
States Artillery. Now Brevet Captain United States Army. 

John- Tl-rxer, 

Adjutant 12th Rhode Island Volunteers, October 13, 18ij2. 
Resigned December 25, 1862. 

CLASS OF 1846. 
James Axni.s, 

Private Comxiany H, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
— September 1, lSi>2. 

Henry A. DeWitt, 

Private Company C, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2, 

1861. Promoted to Engineer, rank of Second Lieutenant, 
May 31, 1861. Mustered out August 2, 1861. 

Arthur F. Dexter, 

Captain Company A, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2, — 
August 2, 1861. On Staff Brigadier General Tyler, April, 

1862. Resigned. 

John H. Hammond, 

Sergeant Battery A, 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery, June 6, 
1861. Wounded June 30, 1862, at battle before Richmond, Va. 
Discharged October, 1862, on Surgeon's certificate. Second 
Lieutenant Hospital Guards, Rhode Island Volunteers, 
December 13, 1862,— August 26, 1865. 

Charles H. Merri^fax, 

Adjutant 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, Maj- 2, — August 2, 
1861. Appointed Major 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, Jlay 
2(i, 1862. Resigned. 

Frank Wheaton, 

First Lieutenant 4th United States Cavalry, March 3, 1855. 
Captain U. S. Cavalry, March 1, 1861. Lieutenant-Colonel 2d 



IN THE CIVIL WAK. 57 

Rhode Island Volunteers, June, 1861; Colonel, July 22, 
1861. Brigadier-General Volunteers, November 29, 1862. 
Major 2d Cavalry, United States Army, November 5, 1863. 
Brevet Colonel United States Army, October 19, 1864. Bre- 
vet Major-General Volunteers, October 19, 1864. Brevet 
Lieutenant-Colonel United States Army, May 5, 1864, for 
bravery at tlie Battle of the Wilderness. Brevet Colonel, 
June, 1864. Brevet Brigadier-General, April, 1865. Brevet 
Major-General United States Army, July, 1865. After the 
close of war, Lieutenant-Colonel 39th United States Infan- 
try, November, 1865. Still in the service. Colonel 2d United 
States Infantry. 

CLASS OF 1847. 

Sylvester Marble, 

Corporal Company A, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2, — 
August 2, 1861. 

William Marchant, 

Private Company K, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2,— 
August 2, 1861. 

Lewis H. Metcalf, 

Private Ellsworth Zouave Regiment, New York Volunteers, 
April, 1861. Lost a leg and taken prisoner at Bull Run, 
July 21, 1861, and carried to Richmond. Exchanged and 
mustered out October, 1862, on surgeon's certificate. 

John P Shaw, 

Sergeant-Major 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, April 18, 1861. 
Second Lieutenant Company F, 2d Rhode Island Volun- 
teers, June 6, 1861; First Lieutenant, July 22,1861; Cap- 
tain July 24, 1862. Killed at Battle of the Wilderness, May 
12, 1864. 

Alexander V G. Taylor, 

Private Company C, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2, — 
August 2, 1861. 



58 THE HIGH SCHOOL 

CLASS OF 1848. 
William E. Bowex, 

First Sergeant Battery E, September 3), 1861. Mustered out 
March 14, 18(i2, for disability 

Thomas H. Carrique, 

Private Company 3M, 3d Regiment Rhode I.sland Heavy Artil- 
lery, January, 1862. Second Lieutenant Company H, Feb- 
ruary, 1863. First Lieutenant, February, 1864. Commis- 
sioned by War Department, First Lieutenant in Signal 
Corps, United States Army, August 8, 1864. Mustered out 
at close of \Yar. 

Feancis W Goddard, 

Private Company C, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2, 1861. 
Captain Carbineers, Juue 27, 1861. Mustered out August 2, 
1861. 

Levi R. Greene, 

Third Assistant Engineer United States Navy, September, 
1857. Second Assistant Engineer, on Frigate Niagara, 1860, 
which conveyed Japanese Commission to Japan. Returned 
to United States in April, 1861. Without landing, ordered, 
April 17, to blockade off Charleston, S. C, and captured 
the first prize of the war. Served in Gulf Squadron, June, 
1862. On special duty at Baltimore, 186;^. and at Providence, 
R. I., to superintend construction government machinery. 
First Assistant Engineer (Master) United States Navy, Octo- 
ber 15, 1863. Served in James River Squadron until the sur- 
render of Richmond. Served in Brazil Squadron 1865 — 1866. 
On special service at Boston, 1867—1868. Resigned July 1, 1869. 

James Nichols, 

Sergeant Company F, 5th Rhode Island Volunteers, August 
14, 1862— June 26, 1863. 

Samuel A Peakce, Jr., 

First Lieutenant 10th lUiode Island Battery, May 26,— August 
30,1862. Additional Paymaster United States Army; Major 
and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel, 1864. 



IN THE Civil. WAR. 59 

HOKATIO ROGEKS, Jr., 

First Lieutenant 3d Rhode Island Heavy Artillery, August 
27, 1861. Captain, October 9, 1861. Major, August 18, 1862. 
Colonel 11th Rhode Island Volunteers, December 27, 1862. 
Colonel 2d Rhode Island Volunteers, January 29, 1863. Re- 
signed and mustered out January 14, 1864. Brevet Briga- 
dier-General United States Volunteers, March 13, 1865. 
Charles H. Tompkins, 

Captain 1st Battery, April, 18G1. Major 1st Rhode Island 
Light Artillery, August 1, 1861. Colonel, September 13, 1861, 
Chief of Artillery under Brigadier-General Stone, Novem- 
ber, 1861, and General Sedgwick, in Virginia campaigns 
of 1862, 1863 and 1864. Brevet Brigadier-General, August 1, 
1864. Chief of Artillery 6th Army Corps. Mustered out 
April 21, 1865. 

CLASS OF 1849. 
Theodore Andrews, 

Private Company D, Ist Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2,- 
August 2, 1861. 

Nicholas B. Bolles, 

First Lieutenant Company H, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, 
May 26,— September 1, 1862. 
George E. Church, 

Captain Company C, 7th Rhode Island Volunteers, July 26, 
1862. Lieutenant-Colonel, January 27, 1863. Colonel 11th 
Rhode Island Volunteers, February 28,— July 6, 1863. Ap- 
pointed Colonel 2nd Rhode Island Volunteers, December 
31, 1864, but not mustered. 
George W Field, 

Corporal Battery A, 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery, 1861. 
First Lieutenant Battery F, 1862. Resigned October 26,1862. 
Second Lieutenant Company B, 4thRhode Island Volunteers. 
Killed July 30, 1864, in attack on fortifications before 
Petersburg, Va. 
William A. Harris, 

Private Company D, 10th Regiment Rhode Island Volnnteers, 
May 26,— September 1, 1862. 



{]{) THE HIGH SCHOOL 

Jeffrey Hazard, 

Second Lieutenant Battery A, 1st Rhode Island Light Artil- 
lery, and Regimental Adjutant October 5, 1861. Captain 
Battery H, October 1, 1862. Resigned August 17, 1863. 

James S. IIudsox, 

Private Company D, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2,— 
August 2, 1861. First Lieutenant Company F, 11th Rhode 
Island Volunteers, October 1, 1862— July 13, 1863. 

Hazard A. Reyxolds, 

Private Company K, 2d Rhode Island Volunteers, June 5, 
1861. Wounded at the Battle of Bull Run, July 21, 1861. 
Sergeant Company K, July 22, 1861. Mustered out June 17, 
1861. 

Frank A. Rhodes, 

First Lieutenant 10th Rhode Island Battery, May 26, — Sep- 
tember 1, 1862. 

Jacob Silloway, Jr., 

First Lieutenant 6th Nevs' York Volunteers, May 25, 1861 — 
June 26, 1863. 

Samuel Thurber, (also teacher in High School, 1859-'65). 

Private Company I, Second Lieutenant and First Lieutenant 
Company K, 11th Rhode Island Volunteers, October 1, 1862 
—July 13, 1863. 

John A. Tompkins, 

Major 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery, October 1, 1862. 
Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel, August 1, 1864. Lieutenant- 
Colonel November 1, 1864. Acting Assistant Inspector of 
Artillery Middle Military Division. Mustered out March 
29, ISlK'i. 

CLASS OF 1850. 

John C. Baijcock, 

Captain and Chiif of Scouts with Grant's armv. 



IN THE CIVIL WAR. ()] 

Chakles H. Bartlktt, 

Sergeant Company H, 11th Rhode Island Volunteers, October 
1, 1862— July 13, 1863. 

J. Halsey DeWolf, 

Private Company D, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, — 
September 1, 1862. 

James H. Earle, 

Assistant Paymaster United States Navy. Prisoner of war and 
died at Andersonville. 

Robert H. I. Goddard, 

Private Company C, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2, — 
August 2, 1861. Lieutenant and volunteer Aid-de-Camp 
on General Burnside's staff, September 20, 1862. Captain 
March 11, 1863. Brevet Major, August 4, 1864. Brevet 
Lieutenant-Colonel April 2, 1865, and Assistant Inspector- 
General 9th Army Corps. Mustered out at close of the war. 

George O. Gorton, 

Private Company C, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2, 1861. 
First Sergeant Carbineers, June 27, — August 2, 1861. Second 
Lieutenant Company M, 3d Rhode Island Heavy Artillery, 
February o, 1862. First Lieutenant Company B, October 
28, and Adjutant, November 1, 1862. Appointed Captain 
November 2, 1863, but declined muster. Mustered out Octo- 
ber 5, 1864. 

Arnold Green, 

Private Company C, First Rhode Island Volunteers, May 29, 
—August 2, 1861. 

Earl C. Harris, 

Second Lieutenant Company H, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, 
May 2,— August 2, 1861. 

Joel Metcalf, Jr., 

Sergeant Company F, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
— September 1, 1862. First Lieutenant and Captain Com- 
pany H, 11th Rhode Island Volunteers, October 1, 1862 — 

6 



(ri niK IIIGII SCHOOL 

July 1-"., 18(i:'.. Captain C'umpany 1>, lith Rhode Island 
Heavy Artillery ((-olorcd), September 22, iw;:' — (Jetober 2, 
18(r.. 

JoSF.PH II. ^IkTCALI-'. 

Second Lieutenant, First Lieutenant and Adjutant 14th !Maine 
Volunteers. Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General 
United States Volunteers, Septemlier 4, ]S(i:.!. Mustered out 
at close of war. 

Ml N SON H. Najac, 

Serjeant Company A, ls( Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2, — 
August 2, 18t>l. First Sergiant Company K, lOtli Rhode 
Island Volunteers, ]N[ay 2(;, — September 1, 18G2. Second 
Lieutenant Company I, 12th Rhode Island Volunteers, 
October i:!, 18l)2. First Lieutenant Company' I, February 
19,— July 29, 18Go. 

CLASS OF 1851. 

Frank G. Allkx, 

Corporal 1st Rhode Island Battery, May 2, — Auu'ust (J, 18G1. 
Appointed Quartermaster New York Cavalry, 18(12, but re- 
signed for disaliility. \'olunteer Aid on Staff General Con- 
ner, 18()4. 
Fkedeimc S. Batcueller, 

Private Company D, 1st Rhode Islau'l Volunteers, May 2, — 
August 2, 1S()1. 

AiJiEKT G. Batf.s, 

First Lieutenant Company G, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, 
'Slay 2,— Aui;ust 2, lS(il. Sergeant Company D, 11th Rhode 
Island Volunteers, Octol)er 1, 18(J2. Second Lieutenant 
Company C, November G, 18(12. Mustered out July 13,18(53. 

Leandek C IjEIA iiek, 

Second Lieutenant Company A, 10th Rhode Island Voluu- 
t('(jrs, ;May 2G, — September 2, lSli2. 
WiLLiA^r li. Benxktt, 

Private Company C, 1st Rhode Islaiul Volunteers, :\Iay 2,— 
August 1, 18G1. 



IN THE CIVIL AVAi;. Go 

Lucius S. Bolles, 

Assistant Surgeon 2d Rhode Island Volunteers, March 9,— 
September 10, 1863. 

Sajiuel T. Browxe, 

Private Company D, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
— September 1, 1862. Volunteer Assistant Paymaster United 
States Navy, September 30, 1862. Served in North and South 
Atlantic blockading squadron till close of war. Assistant 
Paymaster (Master), March 9, 1865. Served in Asiatic 
squadron 1866 — 1869. Naval Storekeeper at Rio de Janeiro, 
1870, and at Annapolis, Md., from 1873 to 1877. Died on 
United States Ship Powhattan, Newport, R. I., June 15, 1881. 

John H. Cady, 

Private Comjaany D, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
—September 1, 18(;2. 

Francis V Kelly, 

Private Troop C, 2d Rhode Island Cavalry, December 12, 
1892. Transferred to 1st Louisiana Cavalry, August 24, 
1863. Transferred to 3d Rhode Island Cavalry, Troop I, 
January 14, 18(;4. Mu.stered out at close of war. 

George E. Randolph, 

Sergeant-Major Battery A, 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery, 
June 6, 1861. Wounded July 21, 1861, at Battle of Bull Run, 
Virginia. Second Lieutenant August 14, 1861. First Lieu- 
tenant Battery C, September 13, 1861. Captain Battery E, 
September 30, 1861. Chief of Artillery od Army Corps, 
1863 — at Gettysburg. Resigned December 29, 1863. Brevet 
Major, Lieutenant-Colonel and Colonel, LTnited States Vol- 
unteers. 

Richard K. Randolph, 

Lieutenant Company I, 12th Illinois Volunteers, 16th Army 
Corps, and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, 1861. Taken 
prisoner at the Battle of Shiloh, April 6, 1862. Put in irons 
for attempting to escape. Exchanged November, 1862, and 
honorably discharged. 



64 THE HIGH SCHOOL 

AViLLiAM E. Tabkk. Jr.. 

Private Company A, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2,— 
August 2, 1861. Captain Company A, 10th Rhode Island 
Volunteers, May 26,— September 1, lS(i2. 

Richard "Waterman. 

Private 1st Battery Rhode Island Light Artillery, May 2,— 
August 2, 1861. First Lieutenant Battery C, August 8, 1861. 
Captain Battery C, July 2.5, 1802— September 2, 186-i. 

CLASS OF 1852. 
William C. Almy, 

Private Coaipany A, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2, — 

August 2, 1861. 

Amos M. Bowen, 

Private Company A, 1st Rhode Island A'olunteers, Enlisted 
April 1.5, 1801. Captured at Battle of Bull Run, July 21, 1861. 
A prisoner at Richmond, Virginia, and Salisbury, North 
Carolina. Exchanged May 22, 1862. First Lieutenant Com- 
pany C, 2d Rhode Island Volunteers, January 22, 1803. 
Aid-de-Camp on staff of General Eustis. Clustered out 
June 17, 1864. 

Howard Greene, 

Lieutenant 24tli Wisconsin Volunteers, at Antietam, 1802. 
Captain on General Lytle's Staff, 1863. Killed at Mission- 
ary Ridge in a charge on the enemy, November 25, 1863. 

EinvARD N. Gould, 

Corporal Co.-npaa,- D, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 
26,— September 1, 1802. 

Thomas J. Griffin. 

Private Company A, and Hospital Steward, 1st Rhode Island 
Volunteers, May 2, — August 2, 1801. Hospital Steward, 4th 
Rhode Island Volunteers, October 30, 1851— October LI, 1864. 

.1 Ai.i'.ERT Monroe, 

First Lieutenant B;ittery A. Isf Rhode Island Light Artillery, 
June 6,1861. Captain Battery D, September 7, 1W1 . Chief 



IX THE CIVIL WAR. 65 

of Artillery General Doubleday's Division. Major and 
Lientenant-Colonel 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery, Octo- 
ber 21, 185-!— Ostober 5, 1861 Afterwards assigned to special 
duty of establishing an Artillery Camp of Instruction near 
Washington, D. C. 

Mc Walter B. Noyes, 

Chaplain 5th Rhode Island Volunteers, November 7, ISPl — 
August 15, 1862. 

Frank H. Thurber, 

Private Company K, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, — 
September 1, 1862. 

Ajiasa C. Tourtellot, 

First Sergeant 10th Battery Rhode Island Volunteers, May 
26,— August 30, 1862. 

William L. Wheaton, 

Hospital Steward 2d Rhode Island Volunteers, June 6, 1861. 
Second Lieutenant Company F, September 28, 1861. First 
Lieutenant Company F, July 24, 1862. 

CLASS OF 1853. 

William H. Ayer, 

Private Company I, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, — 
September 1, 1802. First Lieutenant Company A, 11th 
Rhode Island Volunteers, October 1, 1862. Cajjtain Com- 
pany A, December 31, 1862— July 13, 1863. 

Ch.vrles H. Beedle, 

Corporal Company K, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
— September 1, 1862, 

Horace 8. Bradford, 

Acting Assistant Paymaster, United States Navy, February 
24, 1862— December 1, 1863. 

Thomas T. Caswell, 

Assistant Paymaster (Master), United States Navy, Septem- 
ber 9, 1861. Paymaster (Lieutenant-Commander), Septem- 
ber 17, 1863. Still in the service. 



66 THE hi(;h school 

George "Wheaton Cole, 

Master's Mate, United States Navy. 1861. Killed April 24, 
1862, on Sloop of war "Iroquois," at the capture of Fort 
Jackson, Mississippi river. 

Samuel T CrsHiN(T, 

Captain and Commissary Subsistence of Volunteers, United 
States Army, February 9, 1863. 

James A. DeWolf, 

Private Company C, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2, — 
August 2, 1861. Captain and Commissary Subsistence of 
Volunteers United States Army, November 16, 1S61. 

William W Douglas, 

Second Lieutenant Company B, 5th Rhode Island Heavy 
Artillery, November 30, 1861. First Lieutenant Company 
D, June T, 1862. Captain Company D, February U, 1863— 
December 20, 186-t. 

Cornelius Draper, 

Private Company C, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2, — 
August 2, 1862. 

Samuel Foster, 2d, 

Corporal Company D, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2, 

1861. Missing and undoubtedly killed at Battle of Bull 
Run, Va., July 21, 1861. 

AVilliam ^^' Hoppix, Jr., 

Private Company C, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, ^lay 2, — 
August 2, 1861. 
Pardon S. Jasti;a:m, 

Private Companj' C, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2, — 
August 2, 1861. Second Lieutenant 1st Rhode Island Light 
Artillery, October 16, 1861. First Lieutenant, December 6, 

1862. Assistant Adjutant-General Artillery Brigade, .Sd 
Army Corps. Resigned March 2!l, 1864. 

George E. Mason, 

Assistant Surgeon 1st Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, April 
7, — August 2.5, 186.5. 



IN THE CIVIL WAK. 67 

Benjamin F Pabodie, 

Corporal Company H, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
— September 1, 18H2. 
Thomas T. Potter, 

Private Company B, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
— September 1, 1862. 
William M. Silloway, 

Private Company C, 2d Rhode Island Volunteers, July 5, 1861. 
Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, December 15, 1863. 
Henry K. Southwick, 

Second Lieutenant Company F, 2d Rhode Island Volunteers, 
August 29, 1862. First Lieutenant Company F, August 21, 
1863. Captain Company M, 14th Rhode Island Heavy Ar- 
tillery (colored), March 24, 1864— October 2, 1865. 
Henry J. Spooner, 

Second Lieutenant 4th Rhode Island Volunteers, August 27, 
1862. First Lieutenant and Adjutant, October 1, 1862; also 
Acting Adjutant 7th Rhode Island Volunteers. Mustered 
out in 1865. 
Robert H. Thurston, 

Third Assistant Engineer United States Kavy (Midshipman), 
July 29, 1861. Second Assistant Engineer (Ensign), De- 
cember 18, 1862. First Assistant Engineer (Master), Janu- 
ary 30, 1865. Now in the service. 
Benjamin N. Wilbur, 

Private Company B, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
— September 1, 1863. Also served in 61st Mass. Vols. 

CLASS OF 1854. 
Thomas J. Abbott, 

Private Company A, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2, — 
August 2, 1861. 
Joshua M. Addeman, 

Private Company B, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
— September 1, 1862. Captain Company H, 14th Rhode 
Island Heavy Artillery (colored), November 23, 1863 — Octo- 
ber 2, 1865. 



fi8 THE HIGH SCHOOL 

Charles D. Cady. 

Volunteer with 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, at Battle of 
Bull Run, Virginia, July 21, 1861. 

Charles H. Chapman, 

Adjutant 5th Rhode Island Volunteers, December 16, 1861 — 
May 10, 1862; also served in 39th Massachusetts Volunteers. 
Captain 41st Regiment United States Colored Troo]is, 

Edwin Loavk, 

Private Company D, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2, 
ly(;i. Honorably discharged June 4, 18(J1. Sergeant Com- 
pany C, 12th Rhode Island Volunteers, Octolier l.S, lS(i2— 
July 29, 1863. 

William A. Richardson, 

Private Company D, 2d Rhode Island Volunteers, June 6, 
1861— June 17, 1864. 

Charles D. Thurber, 

Private Company K, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2fi. 
—September 1, 1862. 

CLASS OF 1855. 

William B. Avery, 

Private Company A, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2,— 
August 2, 1861. Master's Mate Coast Division, Burnside 
Expedition, December 25, 1,S61. Second Lieutenant New 
York Marine Artillery, February 15, 1862. First Lieutenant, 
,Tuly 1, 18!!2. Captain, August 1, 1862. Chief of Artillery 
on General Ledlie's staff, January 17, 1863. Acting Ensign 
United States Xavy, June 15, 1863. Served as Acting Mas- 
ter and mastered out August 10, 1865. 

John T. Blake, 

Sergeant Battery B, 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery, August 
13, 1861. Wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July 2, 1863. Second 
Lieutenant Battery A, October 28, 1863. 'Mnstered out 
August 12, ISW. 



IN THE CIML WAlt. (j'J 

Edwin Boss, 

Assistant Paymaster United States Navy. 
T. Fred. Bkown, 

Corporal Battery A, 1st Rliode Island Light Artillery, June 
6, 1861. Second Lieutenant Battery C, August 1.3, 1862. 
First Lieutenant Battery B, December 29, 1862. Wounded 
at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863. Captain, April 7, 1864. Brevet 
Major, December 3, 1864. Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel, April 
9, 1865. Inspector-General Artillery Brigade, 2d Army 
Corps. Mustered out June 12, 1865. 

Frederick L. Brown, 

Second Lieutenant Company H, 3d Rhode Island Heavy 
Artillery, January 8, 18(i2. Resigned July 6, 1862. 

Edward W Brown, 

Sergeant Company D, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
—September 1, 1862. 

WiLLiA^r C. Chase, 

First Sergeant, Second Lieutenant and First Lieutenant Com- 
pany B, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, — September 

2, 1862. 

Jesse Comstock, 

Private Company D, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2, — 
August 2, 1861. Wounded and missing at Battle of Bull 
Run, Va., July 21, 1861. Afterwards died, aged 18 j'ears, 5 
months and 20 days. 

Franklin Cooley, 

Corporal Company G, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
—September 2, 1862. 

Charles G. King, 

Hospital Steward, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, — 
September 1,1862. 

Henry S. Latha:^!, Jr., 

Private Company B, 10th Rhode Island Vohinteera, Mar 26,— 
September 1, 1862. 



70 THE HIGH SCHOOL 

AViLLiAM H. Martix, 

Sergeant Company C, 4tli Rhode Island Volunteers, October 
30, 1861. Wounded September 17, 1862, at Antietam. Dis- 
charged December 31, 1862, for disability. 

Isaac P Notes, 

Private Battery H, 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery, October 
14, 1862— June 28, 1865. 

Hexry E. Payne, 

Assistant Surgeon United States Army, 

William J. Potter, 

United States Navy, May, 1863— July, 1864. 

Orville M. Remington, 

Private Company C, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2, — 
August 2, 1861. Sergeant and Second Lieutenant Company 
I, 11th Rhode Island Volunteers, October 1, 1862— July 13, 
1863. 

Charles W Rhodes, 

Private Company C, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2, — 
August 2, 1861. 

Christopher Rhodes, 

Private Company D, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
—September 1, 1862. 

Albert O. Robbins, 

Private Troop B, 1st Rhode Island Cavalry, December 20, 
1861. Assistant Surgeon, 2d Rhode Island Volunteers, 
November, 1863. Resigned January, 1864. 

Edward H. Sears, 

First Lieutenant Company D, 2d Rhode Island Volunteers, 
June 6, 1861. Captain Company D, July 22, 1861. Resigned 
October 18, 1861. First Lieutenant Battery G, 1st Rhode 
Island Light Artillery, October 19, 1861. Resigned Novem- 
ber 14, 1862. Acting Assistant Paymaster United States 
Navy, August 27, 1863. 



ix the cixil war. 71 

John Tetlow, Jr., 

Corporal Company B, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
— Septeuiber 1, 1862. Captain Company I, Rhode Island 
Detached Militia, on special United States service at Bon- 
net Point, Narragansett Bay, June, 1863. Mustered out, July, 
1863. 

Charles H. Tillinghast, 

Acting Ensign United States Navy. 
Joseph C. Whiting, Jr., 

Corporal Company E, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
—September 1, 1862. Adjutant 14th Rhode Island Heavy 
Artillery (colored), September 14, 1863— October 2, 1865. 

CLASS OF 1856. 
Allen Baker, Jr., 

First Lieutenant Troop B, 1st Rhode Island Cavalry, Decem- 
ber 14, 1861. Captain Troop E, July 15, 1862. Wounded 
March 17,1863. Transferred to Troop D, new organization, 
December 21, 1804. 

Henry R. Barker, 

Sergeant Company I, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
—September 1, 1862. 

C. Henry Barney, 

Private Company A, 5th Rhode Island Heavy Artillery, De- 
cember 16, 1861. Promoted to Corporal and Sergeant. Dis- 
charged January 14, 1864, to receive commission in 14th 
Rhode Island Heavy Artillery (colored). Second Lieutenant 
and First Lieutenant Company F, 14th R. I. H. A., Decem- 
ber 2, 1863— October 2, 1865. 

George B. Barrows, 

Private Company D, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26,— 
September 1, 1862. 
Charles H. Clark, 

Corporal Battery A, 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery, June 
6, 1861. Second Lieutenant Battery C, September 13, 1861. 
Resigned August 25, 1862. 



72 THK llUill SCIK^MT, 

CiiAKi.Es C. Ci;A<aN, 

Private Company B, 10th IMilkIi; Island Voluntet-rs, May L'l;, 
—September 1, 1S(1'_'. Private Company D, 2(1 Rhode Island 
Volunteers, October s, 18(13 — December 8, 18G3. Captain 
Company F, 14th Rhode Island Heavy Artillery (colored), 
December 5, 1863— October 2, 1865. 

William E. Clarke, 

Company C, 11th Rhode Island Volunteers. SiMcmd Lieuten- 
ant Company A, October 1, 1862. First Lieutenant and Aid- 
ile-Camp on staff of Brigadier-General Sloiigh, Alexandria, 
Va., March G,— June 20, 1863. ^rustered out July 13, ]S6:i. 

Samuel K. Dokhaxce, 

Sergeant Compan3' D, 10th flhode Island Volunteer.s, May 26, 
18(52. Honorably discharged July l."i, 18(;2. 

Charles D. Owex, 

First Lieutenant Battery A, 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery, 
December 2, 1861. Captain Battery G, December 21, 1861. 
Resigned Deceml)pr 2-1, 1862. 

Rouekt H. Paine, 

Private Compauy D, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
— September 1, 1862. 

Sumner U. Shearman, 

Second Lieutenant 4th Rhode Island Vohinteers, August 27, 
1S(!2. First Lieutenant, November 2.5, 1862. Captain, March 
7, 1863. Captured ))efore Petersburg, Va., July 30, 1864. A 
prisoner at Columbia, S. C. E.Kchangi'd December 7, 1864. 
>[nstered out Deceuibcr 17, ]8(i4. 

CL.ASS OF 18.57- 

John II. Ai-plkion, 

Color Corporal Coiniiuny I, Rhode Ishmd Detached Militia, 
on special United States service at Bonnet Point, Xarragan- 
sett Bay, June, M<i\-A. :\lnstered out July, 18(i3. 



I\ THE CIVIL WAK. 73 

Daaid S. Bostwick, 

Acting Assistant Paymaster United States Navy, November 
17, 1863— October 1, 1865. 

Frederick G. Chaffix, 

Private Company H, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
—September 1, 1862. 

Edward E. Chase, 

Sergeant-Major 1st Rhode Island Cavalry, December 14, 1861. 
First Lieutenant Troop E, August 4, 1862. Captain Troop 
H, February 14, 1863. Taken prisoner June 18, 1863. Ex- 
changed, and mustered out March 1, 1865. 

Frank A. Church, 

Private Company K, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
—September 1, 1862. 

Walter H. Coleman, 

Aid-de-Camp on Staff of Governor Sprague in early part of 
war, 1861 and 1862. Through the Peninsula Campaign, at- 
tached to the Headquarters of General Commanding Army 
of Potomac, where Governor Sprague, by authority of the 
War Department had a staff officer present. 

Harry C. Gushing, 

Corporal Battery A, 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery, June 
6, 1861. Second Lieutenant Battery F, 4th United States 
Artillery, November 1, 1861. First Lieutenant Battery H, 
4th United States Artillery. Brevet and First Lieutenant 
United States Army. Brevet Captain United States Army. 
Brevet Major United States Army. Still in the service. 

John K. Dorrance, 

Private Company D, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26 
— September 1, 1862. Second Lieutenant Company E, 2d 
Rhode Island Volunteers, September 15, 1864. First Lieu- 
tenant Company E, December 5, 1864. Wounded before 
Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865. Brevet First Lieutenant 
April 2, 1865. Brevet Captain and mustered out June 20, 186.1. 

7 



74 the high scik^ol 

Charles P Gay, 

Sergeant Company H, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
— September 1, 18G2. Second Lieutenant Company A, llth 
Rhode Island Heavj- Artillery (colored), October 10, 18G3. 
Resigned April 17, 1864. 

Albert E. Ham, 

Private Company D, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2G, — 
September 1, 1862. 

Edward G. King, 

Private Company D, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
1862. Honorably discharged June, lS(i2. 

LrciEX E. Kent, 

Private Company D, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
— September 1, 1862. Also in United States Xavy. 

Carlo Mauran, 

Private Company K, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
— September 1, 1802. 
George B. Peck, Jr., 

Second Lieutenant Company G, 2d Rhode Island Volunteers, 
December 13, 1864. Wounded at the Battle of Sailors' 
Creek, near Petersburg, Va., April 6, 1865. Resigned and 
mustered out June 30, 1865. 

Charles S. Treat, 

First Lieutenant and Adjutant Troop E, 1st Rhode Island 
Cavalry, December 16, 1661. Resigned May 30, 1862. 
George W Van Slyck, 

Captain 128th New York Volunteers, Jul}-, 1862. Major, July, 
1864. "Wounded at Port Hudson, and honorably discharged 
May, 1865. 
William A. Wilson, 

Private Company A, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2,— 
August 2, 1861. Sergeant Company K, 10th Rhode Island 
Volunteers, May 26,— September 1, 18G2. Private Company 
E, 11th Rhode Island Volunteers, October 1, 1862— July 13 
18G3. ' 



IN THE CIVIL, WAR. 75 

Ira R. Wilbue, 

Corporal Company E, 10th Khode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
— September 1, 1862. 

CLASS OF 1858. 
John R. Baetlett, Jr., 

Midshipman United States Navy, November 25, 1859. On 
duty 1861, under Admiral Farragut at New Orleans. En- 
sign September 8, 1863, on Staff Admiral Dahlgren. Lieu- 
tenant February 22, 1864, under Admiral Porter. Com- 
manded sailors in assault on Fort Fisher, and was presented 
with a vote of thanks by the General Assembly of Bhode 
Island for his part in that victory. Lieutenant-Commander 
July 25, 1866. Commander April 25, 1877. Now in command 
of United States Coast Survey Steamer Blake. 

George T. Baker, 

Corporal Company B, 10th Bhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
—September 1, 1862. 

J. Nelson Bogman, 

Corporal Company M, Third Khode Island Hea-^'y Artillery, 
March 17, 1862 Mortally wounded October 22, 1862, in 
action at Pocotaligo, S. C, and died October 26, from his 
wounds at Port Boyal, S. C. 

Zephaniah Brown, 2d, 

Corporal Company K, 10th Bhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
— September 1, 1862. First Lieutenant Company D, llth 
Rhode Island Heavy Artillery (colored), October 24, 1863. 
Acting Adjutant 1st Battalion. Besigaed June 1, 1865. 

Samuel S. Davis, 

Private Company D, 10th Bhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
—September 1, 1862. 

Peter Hunt, 

Sergeant-Major Battery C, 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery, 
August, 1861. Second Lieutenant Battery A, October, 1862. 
First Lieutenant Battery A, November, 1862. Mortally 



76 THE HIGH SCHOOL 

wounded at Battle of Cold Harbor, \a., "SUij 30, 18(34. Died 
in Washington, D. C, June li, ISiii. 

Charles G. Ixgrahaji, 

Sergeant Company F, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, ISIay 26, 
—September 1, 1802. 

Hexry H. Metcalf, 

Private Company C, 3d Khode Island Heavy Artillery, Janu- 
ary 1,18(12; Sergeant, May 1; First Sergeant, September 
7, 1862; Second Lieutenant, November 28, 1862; First 
Lieutenant, April 24, 1863. Mustered out March 17, 18(15. 

Petton H. Raxdolph, 

Private Company F, 1st Ehode Island Volunteers, May 2, — 
August 2, 1861. Volunteer Officer United States Navy, No- 
vember 11, 18G3— October 31, 1865. 

Hexry C. Salisbury, 
United States Navy. 

Charles L. Stafford, 

Sergeant Company B, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
— September 1, 1802. Second Lieutenant Company B, 14th 
Rhode Island Heavy Artillery (colored), May 15, 1863. First 
Lieutenant Company I, and Battalion Adjutant, 3Iay 11, — 
October 2, 18(;5. 

Frank A. Waterman, 

Sergeant Battery D, 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery, Sep- 
tember 4, 1801. Second Lieutenant Battery G, July 14, 
1864. First Lieutenant Battery F, May 16, 1805, and mus- 
tered out July 14, 1805. 

CL.4SS OF 1859. 
"Willia.-m F Atwood, 

Private Company A, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
1802. Died in Washington, D. C, June 28, 1802. 

N.iTHAN H. I5AKER, 

Corporal Company B, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 20, 
September 1, 1802. 



in the civil wak. 77 

Joseph D. Brooks, 

Private Company E, 11th Khode Island Volunteers, October 
1, 1862, July 13, 1863. 

James W Blackwood, 

Private Company B, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
—September 1, 1862. 

William V Carr, 

First Lieutenant Company G, 2d Regiment Rhode Island Vol- 
unteers, February 10, 1865. Captain Company G, July 11, 
1865, and mustered out July 13, 1865. 

William P. Cragin, 

Private Company B, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
—September 1, 1862. 

Jesse P, Eddy, 

Corporal Company K, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
—September 1, 1862. 

Frank Frost, 

Private Company B, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, — 
September 1, 1862. Private Company D, 11th Rhode Island 
Volunteers, October 1, 1862— July 13, 1863. Second Lieuten- 
ant Company M, llth Rhode Island Heavy Artillery (col- 
ored), December 24, 1863— June 14, 1865. 

Charles B. Greene, 

Private Company B, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
— September 1, 1862. Private Company 1, 11th Rhode Island 
Volunteers, October 1, 1862— July 13, 1863. 

Benjamin E. Kellt, 

Private Company C, 1st Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2, — 
August 1, 1861. First Sergeant and Sergeant-Major Battery 
G, 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery, December 2, 1861. 
Second Lieutenant Battery G, November 18, 1862, for gal- 
lantry at the Battle of Antietam. Killed at the second 
Battle of Fredericksburg Va., May 3, 1863. 



78 THE HIGH SCHOOL 

John B. Kelly, 

Corporal Company B, 10th Khode Island Volunteers, May 26, 

September 2, 1862. First Sergeant Company 1, 11th Rhode 

Island Volunteers, October 1, 1863— July 13, 1863. 

John E. Larxed, Jr., 

Private Company H, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26,— 
September 1, 1862. 

Charles M. Latham, 

Private Company B, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, — 
September 1, 1862. In Signal Corps. Died in the service. 

George F Manx. 

Private Company K, 6th Independent New York Horse Ar- 
tillery, October 5, 1861—1864. 

George F Orjisbee, 

United States ISTavy. 

"William K. Potter, 

Private Company I, 11th Rhode Island Volunteers, October 
1, 1862— July 13, 1863. 

Dana B. Robinson, 

Private Company B, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
—September 1, 1862. 

George H. Sparhawk, 

Private Company B, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
— September 1 , 1862. Corporal Company I, 11th Rhode 
Island Volunteers, October 1, 1862— July 13, 1863. 

William A. Spicer, 

Private Company B, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
1862. Detached on special service at Headquarters Army 
of Virginia, July 2, 1862. Mustered out September 1, 1862. 

CLASS OF 1860. 

Charles H. Anthony, 

Private Company B, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26,— 
September 1, 1862. 



ix the civil wak. 79 

Horace K. Blanchard, 

Private Company B, 10th Rhode Island Vohmteers, May 26, 
September 1, 1862. 

Arthur W Dennis, 

Adjutant-General's office, Rhode Island, 1862—1863. Deputy 
Provost Marshal, Oregon, June, 1863. Mustered out in 1865. 

James F Field, 

Private Company B, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26,— 
September 1, 1862. 

Edwin B. Fiske, 

Private Company B, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May, 26, 
—September 1, 1862. 

William A. H. Grant, 

Corporal Company E, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
—September 1, 1862. 

David Hunt, Jr., 

Private Company B, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26. 
Honorably discharged June, 1862. 

J. Wilson McCrillis, 

Private Company K, lOtli Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
1862. Honorably discharged June, 1862. 

Samuel T. Mitchell, 

Private Company K, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26,— 
—September 1, 1862. Company C, 11th Rhode Island Vol- 
imteers, October 1, 1862— July 13, 1863. 

Fenner H. Peckham, Jr., 

Private Comisany E, 3d Rhode Island Heavy Artillery, No- 
vember 6, 1861. Detached as Acting Assistant Hospital 
Steward, December 1, 1861 — December 31, 1862. Second 
Lieutenant Companies B, H, and I, 12th Rhode Island Vol- 
unteers, December 31, 1862— March 7, 1863. Resigned July 
29, 1863. 



80 THE HIGH SCHOOL 

John A. Reyxold;^, 

Private Company B, 10th Ehode Island Volunteers, May 2C>,— 
September 1, 1862. Corporal Company I, 11th Rhode Island 
Volunteers, October 1, 18(i2— July 13,18(53. Second Lieuten- 
ant Company F, 11th Bhode Island Heavy Artillery (col- 
ored), December 23, 1863— October 2, 1865. 

Howard O. Sturges, 

Corporal Company D, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, Mar 
26,— September 1, 1862. 

Fraxk F. Tingley, 

Private Company B, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26. 
Honorably discharged June, 1862. 

William P Vaughan, 

Corporal Company B, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, ^lay 26, 
— September 1, 1862. 

CLASS OF 1861. 
Daniel Bush, 

Corporal Company D, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
September 1, 1862. Second Lieutenant Company B, 11th 
Rhode Island Volunteers, October 1, 1862. First Lieuten- 
ant Company H, April 14, 1863. Mustered out July 13, 1863. 

Jesse M. Bush, 

Private Company B, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26,— 
September 1, 1862. 

Frederick W Granger 

Private 10th Rhode Island Battery, May 26,— August 30, 1862. 
Charles T. Greene, 

Private Company B, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 2G, 
—September 1, 1862. Private and Sergeant 3d Rhode Island 
Cavalry, March 14,— June 7, 1864. Second Lieutenant Com- 
pany A, 14th Rhode Island Heavy Artillery, July 12, 1864 — 
October 2, 1865. 

Charles L. Hodges, 

2.'ith United States Infantry 



IX THE CIVIL WAK. <Sl 

William D. Masox, 

Served in Signal Corps, United States Army, April i, 1864 — 
August 2(5, 1865. 

Frederick Metcalf, 

Enlisted as a private in Company B, lOth Khode Island Vol- 
unteers, May 20, 18C2. Not mustered, being only 15 years 
of ag 1. Second Lieutenant 3d Rhode Island Heavy Artil- 
lery, October, 1863. Post-Adjutant, Fort Pulaski, Georgia. 
First Lieutenant May 27, 1864. Died at Beaufort, S. C, 
August 28, 1864, in the seventeenth year of his age. 

Brockholst Matiiewsox, 2r), 

Corporal Company D, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
—September 1, 1862. 

Eugene F Phillips, 

Corporal Company A, 10th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, 
— September 1, 1862. 

John E. Read, 

Corporal Company I, 11th Rhode Island Volunteers, October 
1, 1862— July 13, 1863. 

Charles M. Sjiith, 

Private Company D, lOtli Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26, — 
September 1, 1862. Second Lieutenant Company L, 14th 
Rhode Island Heavy Artillery, January 30, 1864. Mustered 
out October 2, 1865. 

CLASS OF 1862. 

Harry A. Richardson, 

Company K, 9th Rhode Island Volunteers, May 26,— Septem- 
ber 2, 1862. 

CLASS OF 1863. 

James C. Butterworth, Jr., 

Enlisted as Private in Providence Marine Corps Artillery, for 
special United States service at Bonnet Point, Narragansett 
Bay, June 1863. Mustered out July, 1863. 



82 THE HIGH SCHOOL 

Eugene F Granger, 

Kew Hampshire Volunteers. Missing and reported to have 
died in prison at Salisbury, N. C. 

Richard E. Thompson, 

Enlisted as Private in Providence Marine Corps Artillery, for 
special United States service at Bonnet Point, Narragansett 
Bay, June, 1863. Mustered out July, 1863. Now an officer 
in United States Infantry. 



NOTE. 



The utmost care has been taken to make the list published 
on the preceding pages, accurate and complete. It presents 
a most honorable record, and it will be a matter of regret if 
any names have been omitted. About one-fifth of all the 
boys who entered the Providence High School, from its com- 
mencement in 1843 to 1861 inclusive, served in the army 
or navy of the United States during the civil war ; and not 
less than twenty-five per cent, of the classes from 1850 to 
1860 inclusive, are known to have been in the service. 

Number of teachers in the service, 6 ; number of students, 
225. Number who died in the service, 17 



IN THE CIVIL WAR. 



83 



SUMMARY. 



CLASS. 


NUMBER OF BOTS 


NUMBER IN THE 


PERCENTAGE IN 




IN THE SCHOOL. 


SERVICE. 


THE SERVICE. 


1843, 


114 


11 


10 


1844, 


65 


3 


5 


1845, 


54 


7 


13 


1846, 


60 


6 


10 


1847, 


63 


5 


8 


1848, 


53 


8 


15 


1849, 


57 


12 


21 


1850, 


54 


11 


20 


1851, 


59 


13 


22 


1852, 


52 


10 


19 


1853, 


55 


20 


36 


1854, 


39 


7 


18 


1855, 


77 


23 


30 


1856, 


48 


1 


23 


1857, 


55 


18 


33 


1858, 


68 


12 


18 


1859, 


61 


19 


31 


1860, 


65 


14 


22 


1861, 


61 


11 


18 


Total, 


1,160 


221 


Ave'ge,19